Cases where competing claims to a throne were eliminated as a result of the extinction of one royal line

#12
In the Glorious Revolution of 1688, William III of the Netherlands (House of Oranje) and his wife Mary, both Protestants, overthrew Catholic King James II (Stuart)of England and Scotland, who fled into exile. The Stuarts had ruled Scotland for hundreds of years, and inherited the English throne when the Tudor Dynasty died out. William was James' nephew, and Mary was his daughter. James attempted a comeback, but was defeated at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland. William and Mary had no children and were succeeded by Mary's sister, also a Protestant, who became Queen Anne. Anne married a Danish prince and became pregnant 17 times, but all her pregnancies ended in miscarriages, or the death of her children as infants or childhood. She died in 1714, and was succeeded by a distant relative, George I of Hanover in Germany who established the House of Hanover in Britain, and from whom all subsequent British monarchs descend. There were actually more closely related female-line relatives in France, but they were Catholic, and were thus considered ineligible for the throne.

James II had only one surviving legitimate child, another James. This James, known as the Old Pretender, lived almost his whole life in exile in France and Italy, but he landed in Scotland in 1715 and led a short uprising, which was put down, and he returned to exile. However, James the Old Pretender had 2 sons, Charles (Bonnie Prince Charlie) and Henry, who was ordained a priest and became the Cardinal Duke of York. Bonnie Prince Charlie led a Scottish rebellion in 1745, and many of the Highland clans rallied to his attempt to restore the Stuart Dynasty. The rebellion was eventually put down with great severity, and Bonnie Prince Charlie returned to exile. Bonnie Prince Charlie had one child, an illegitimate daughter Charlotte, whom he created titular Duchess of Albany, and whom the Pope made legitimate. . Charlotte and her mother became estranged from her father and had little contact with him. Charlotte became the maitresse of Prince Rohan, the Catholic Cardinal of Bordeaux and had 3 iillegitimate children ( a son and 2 daughters) with him, but due to illegitimacy they had no claim to the throne, and their existence had to remain secret lest it cause a scandal.

Henry, the Cardinal Duke of York, was the last of the royal Stuarts, and he died in in 1807. There are actually some Scottish Stuart noble families still existing in Scotland descended from medieval Scottish Stuart kings. But that was before the Stuarts had inherited the English throne from the Tudors.
 
Aug 2015
2,359
uk
#13
The Houses of Lancaster and York were effectively wiped out by the Wars of the Roses (certainly the male sides), eventually leading to a man with an incredibly tenuous bloodline claim to the throne (aside from his Right by Conquest) marrying a female Yorkist and creating the House of Tudor. Which itself then came to an abrupt end after only a couple of generations with the death of the childless Elizabeth I.
 
Jan 2015
3,190
Rupert's Land ;)
#14
Actually, the legitimate Plantagenet line became extinct in 1499 with the execution of its last male family member. The Plantagenets lost power in 1485, but their line survived for an additional 14 years afterwards.
Earl of Warwick's (Plantagenet) claim to be a "legitimate" heir is questionable as his father had been attained and executed
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,541
SoCal
#15
Earl of Warwick's (Plantagenet) claim to be a "legitimate" heir is questionable as his father had been attained and executed
Fair enough, I suppose--though it is worth noting that, in the French context, Philippe Egalite's treason didn't prevent his son Louis-Philippe from being in the line of succession to the French throne. (True, L-P usurped the French throne in 1830, but even had he not done this, he would have been second in line to the throne after Henri, Count of Chambord.)
 
Jan 2015
3,190
Rupert's Land ;)
#16
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Henry, the Cardinal Duke of York, was the last of the royal Stuarts, and he died in in 1807. There are actually some Scottish Stuart noble families still existing in Scotland descended from medieval Scottish Stuart kings. But that was before the Stuarts had inherited the English throne from the Tudors.
There are still heirs of Charles I extant.

Jacobite succession - Wikipedia
 
#17
There are still heirs of Charles I extant.

Jacobite succession - Wikipedia
Yes, that's true. But they are all Catholic, which disqualifies them for the British throne. (But the Jacobite heirs are still the senior lineal descendants of the old royal Stuarts). Also, Charles II and James II both had illegitimate offspring. Charles had several of his illegitimate sons ennobled, and his illegitimate daughters married into the aristocracy. There's also an illegitimate agnatic (male-line) of Stuarts still extant in Spain who are descended from James II (although the last survivor of that line is now elderly, and though he has daughters, he has no sons, so the agnatic line will soon end).

I think that the illegitimate descendants of Charles II and James II who married into the British aristocracy were ancestors of the late Queen Mother Elizabeth, or of Princess Diana (Spencer), so in due time, if they haven't already, Charles and James will become ancestral to the present or future British monarchs.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,659
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#18
....Theuderic later murdered Theudebert (612) only to be defeated, captured, and murdered by Lothar II in 614 resulting in a reunited Frankish kingdom.
That is incorrect.

Theuderic died of dysentery in his Austrasian capital of Metz in late 613 while preparing a campaign against his longtime enemy, Clotaire, who had, based on a treaty with Theuderic during the last fraternal war, retaken the duchy of Dentelin.
It was Theudric's young son King Sigebert II of Austrasia and Burgundy, under the regency of his great grandmother Brunhilda, who was defeated and killed by Lothar II in 613.

Theuderic has four sons:

King Sigebert II (602-613) killed by Lothar II.
Childebert (born 602) said to have escaped and disappeared.
Corbus (603-613) killed by Lothar II.
Merovech (born 604) spared by Lothar II since he was Lothar's septson. Death date unknown.
 
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Apr 2017
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#19
I suppose you could count Odoacer (the barbarian king of Italy that ended the western empire), Theodoric of the Ostrogoths killed him and his family (exiled a son but later killed him when he tried to return to Italy).
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,659
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#20
Some cousins survived, but they were irrelevant and never posed a threat to the Karađorđević dynasty.
Thee is a difference between being politically irrelevant and genealogically irrelevant. Those Obrenovic cousins remained and remain genealogically relevant. Furthermore, as I remember the heir presumptive of Serbia at the time King Alexander was assassinated was a prince of Montenegro whose heir is the heir to both Montenegro and the Obrenovic claim to Serbia.
 
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