Cases where ethnicity and/or religion was used to help determine national borders?

deaf tuner

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Oct 2013
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Granted the territories they acquired included significant minorities but they were primarily awarded due to the Romanian majority.
"Majority" doesn't mean "the largest ethnicity".

In some regions Romania aquiered after WWI, Romanians were the largest ethnicity, but not the majority.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
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"Majority" doesn't mean "the largest ethnicity".

In some regions Romania aquiered after WWI, Romanians were the largest ethnicity, but not the majority.
Yes, but there were plenty of areas where Romanians did in fact form an actual majority:



The cities were more Magyarized/Germanized than the rural areas were.
 

deaf tuner

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Oct 2013
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BTW, if the roads map of Romania in 1918 was similar to what it was 100 years later, then maybe the important road in the westernmost part of Romania helps explain why Romania got generous borders in the west after the end of WWI:
No.

The strongest arguments of Romania in aquiring Transilvania and Banat were the Romanian and Saxon national assemblies expressing adhesion to the Romanian Kingdom, Romania's participation to WWI, France's support and AH's defeat coupled with it's disastrous minorities policies before WWI.
 

Futurist

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No.

The strongest arguments of Romania in aquiring Transilvania and Banat were the Romanian and Saxon national assemblies expressing adhesion to the Romanian Kingdom, Romania's participation to WWI, France's support and AH's defeat coupled with it's disastrous minorities policies before WWI.
Why'd Romania's western border go a bit west of the ethnic line, though?
 

deaf tuner

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Oct 2013
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Why'd Romania's western border go a bit west of the ethnic line, though?
Because they were on the right side of the table: the winners (IDK if You realize, but Russia didn't existed anymore, actually, so Romanian Kingdom was technically the sole allied country in Central-Eastern Europe at the table of negotiations ...).

Anyway, at negotiations, that border "moved" tents of kilometers west and right daily (if not more then once a day) depending on contacts of Romanian and Hungarian representatives with the Great Powers, before it was "settled".

As I said, Romania after WWI is one the "furthest" from ethnical/religious criteria in that list.

_____
P.S. were from You have that map?
 

Offspring

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Mar 2013
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This map is a beautiful work of art and I might actually have it framed.
Look at "motorway" (length and colour), now look at "motorway under construction" and then at "planned motorway".

We have ~750km of motorways. Bulgaria has a similar amount, but it's two times smaller. Hungary is 2.5 times smaller, but it has more than double the amount of highways. However, we are amazing at drawing orange lines on a map. Also, not all the motorways are operational (for example, the Deva-Lugoj one). You can see Deva on the map, it's in the west, connected to Arad (which is further west, near the tip of the mouth -Romania looks like a fish-). I'm not sure what the status of the planned ones are. These are the ones that are currently underway: Calendarul finalizarii proiectelor de autostrazi in Romania That's 177km. Look at the orange line in the north. There are 465km from Zalau (west) to (Iasi) and the route is more direct: Distanţa Iaşi Zalău

I did something similar when I was young. I told my family I got the 2nd best grade and everyone was happy. I quickly went out to play hide and seek. A few days later, someone asked what the grade was. It was 6. The highest was 7 (it was an unplanned exam and no one was ready).

It's nice to see we are evolving. We had this as the subway map in Bucharest for a very long time (the dotted ones were the planned ones, most are still in that phase):



I'll have more relevant posts.
 
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Futurist

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Because they were on the right side of the table: the winners (IDK if You realize, but Russia didn't existed anymore, actually, so Romanian Kingdom was technically the sole allied country in Central-Eastern Europe at the table of negotiations ...).
Yugoslavia.

Anyway, at negotiations, that border "moved" tents of kilometers west and right daily (if not more then once a day) depending on contacts of Romanian and Hungarian representatives with the Great Powers, before it was "settled".
Yeah, that makes sense. So, basically, the Entente/Allies wanted a powerful Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Yugoslavia in order to serve as a heck on German and Hungarian revanchism. That's not a bad move on their part--or at least it wouldn't have been had they actually consistently been willing to enforce the new post-WWI order.

As I said, Romania after WWI is one the "furthest" from ethnical/religious criteria in that list.
Romania's western borders aren't too different from its ethnic borders, though. They're a little too far to the west, and they don't account for the Szekely and German islands in the middle of Transylvania, but otherwise, they're pretty accurate in comparison to the ethnic borders.

_____
P.S. were from You have that map?
From Wikipedia:

Search results for "romanians 1890 map" - Wikimedia Commons

Here's another Wikipedia map about this topic showing the Romanians in Hungary in 1890 (by percentage):

Search results for "romanians 1890 map" - Wikimedia Commons