Causes of the rise of naval power?

Nov 2019
125
United States
In effective "empires" navies are always of nearly utmost importance. Rome and well before them them the Egyptians even created protean naval forces. Trade is tantamount, and navies are the suppliers of protection toward trade.

Today navies are the ultimate guarantee of free trade amongst nations, erstwhile the privateer forces of the world are ascendant. Simply look at the 18th and early 19th century Mediterranean commerce to reflect on that fact. Small and despotic nation states along the Northern African continents extracted huge amounts of graft from powers to ensure the safe passage of commerce.

That was the cause of the first real use of naval power by the United States.
 

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,717
An additional cause seems to be sufficient safety on land.... e.g being an Island (UK, Japan) or having easily defensible borders (e.g Spain) or having no serious land threats (e.g. Carthage, US) allows the country/entity to focus on naval forces without having the need to maintian large ground armies to defend itself...
Not sure that is the best example as the stronger correlation by far is that states with heavy maritime trade tend to build and maintain large navies firstly because for most of history naval ships were also sometimes trade ships or necessary to protect trade ships regardless of fighting large wars. Japan did not have a large navy for most of its history and it was only when a merchant class developed that Japan showed interest in naval matters with Hideyoshi invaded Korea and tried to force Ming to trade on equal status with Japan. The U.S. was largely a maritime nation for the earliest part of its history with the plantation production being almost entirely for export and most other agricultural products for internal consumption with exports of raw products and imports of manufactured goods from Britain. The U.S. is partially a maritime nation now due to reliance on imports and maintaining the global order but not really to the degree it was or other nations like Singapore or Norway are.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,683
Florania
The County of Peebles was just one of the iron hulled sailing ships. The five masted Preussen was the largest and was fast, being able to make 16 knots.
Does this mean metallic sailing ships work? Can you explain why they were only built since the 19th century?
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,938
Not sure that is the best example as the stronger correlation by far is that states with heavy maritime trade tend to build and maintain large navies firstly because for most of history naval ships were also sometimes trade ships or necessary to protect trade ships regardless of fighting large wars. Japan did not have a large navy for most of its history and it was only when a merchant class developed that Japan showed interest in naval matters with Hideyoshi invaded Korea and tried to force Ming to trade on equal status with Japan. The U.S. was largely a maritime nation for the earliest part of its history with the plantation production being almost entirely for export and most other agricultural products for internal consumption with exports of raw products and imports of manufactured goods from Britain. The U.S. is partially a maritime nation now due to reliance on imports and maintaining the global order but not really to the degree it was or other nations like Singapore or Norway are.
The point is if you have major land threats you simply do not have the resources for a strong navy as land forces get priority
 
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Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,798
United States
Korea put together a standing national navy in the 1370s to counter the massive waegu raider threat, and armed them with cannons and rockets.
 

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,717
The point is if you have major land threats you simply do not have the resources for a strong navy as land forces get priority
Only in the cases that the state is mostly landlocked. Phoenician states, Rome, Netherlands, Genoa, Portugal, etc that depended on trade for large part of their income built and maintained much larger navies than armies despite being bordered by larger aggressive states that had relatively huge armies.
 
Aug 2015
12
Idaho
Does this mean metallic sailing ships work? Can you explain why they were only built since the 19th century?
Why build metallic sailing ships that don't work? The five masted Flying Clipper built in 2018 has a steel hull. Steel is used quite often for modern sailing vessels.
 
May 2019
202
Salt Lake City, Utah
Troy did not need a deep-water navy, for its wealth came from extorting maritime tolls from trade passing through the straits.

It would have no reason to descend on Achaea, whereas the cities of the latter would want access to the Black Sea markets.
 
Feb 2017
158
Latin America
Troy did not need a deep-water navy, for its wealth came from extorting maritime tolls from trade passing through the straits.
Well, evidently it did. Had Troy a navy, the Achaean army would not have been as strong since much of it would have been stopped before landing.

Also, the point about Alfred the Great is interesting. Did the Wessex navy deteriorate after his death? Seeing how Sweyn Forkbeard managed to conquer it over a hundred years later, and we know about William the Conqueror.
 
May 2019
202
Salt Lake City, Utah
Well, obviously Troy did not have a 'deep-water' navy or the Achaeans would not have maintained their beach head for as long as they did.