Chagga Chiefs

Sep 2015
1,549
England
#1
The Chagga peoples of Tanganyika were made up of a series of tribes, whose very existence was the cause of a problem, apparently. That there was intermittent tribal warfare.

Would a federal or federated system have prevented these conflicts? in contrast to Buganda for example? Was it because of their own comparative success economically? Did the prominence of women play a role? Or were they merely dispersed over large tracts of land that made any kind of central administration somewhat impractical. The tribal wars that persisted were a result of the sheer numbers of Chagga that had increased and spread out over this extensive region.
 
Sep 2015
1,549
England
#4
Yes raids appear to have been relatively common, but this doesn't explain the break-up of paramountcy chiefdoms or kingdoms. If the Chagga tribes had there own languages however, loyalty to one chief or paramount chief might have been held, but only for the duration of his lifetime. The Wahehe provide an example of a (contested) succession, from Munyigumga to his son Mkwawa.

'By the 1890s the Wahehe had an immediate following of 2,000 to 3,000 men, with another 20,000 men of fighting age who could be mobilized from their scattered homesteads that by 1800 were normally surrounded by large fields. It was only later when their military reputation alone was no enough and warfare was actually a threat, did they begin to consolidate their villages and begin to build their homes closer together. Only after the wars ended did they once again build further apart with each homestead ideally surrounded by their own fields, larger houses for their many wives were built and could be surrounded by an open courtyard.'
 

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