Change in Earth Precession Axis May Add to Global Warming?

Asherman

Forum Staff
May 2013
3,363
Albuquerque, NM
#2
Wouldn't this more properly be discussed on a site where the emphasis is on science and climatic pattern studies? I'll leave this open for the moment, but let's try to get it within shouting distance of HISTORY ... I don't mean the partisan squabbles that seem so popular with politicians.
 
Likes: M.S. Islam
Mar 2019
1,612
Kansas
#3

M.S. Islam

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
3,333
Dhaka
#4
1/ No because the Earth rotates
Precession is a different motion than rotation. Precession is the reason we have different seasons.
800px-Earth_precession.svg.png
Precessional movement of Earth. Earth rotates (white arrows) once a day around its rotational axis (red); this axis itself rotates slowly (white circle), completing a rotation in approximately 25,772[disputeddiscuss] years
Now see this:

800px-Earth_axial_precession.svg.png
3000 BCE was a lot cooler when only spring was warm. 8000 BCE was even cooler, cold all the year round.

Source: Axial precession - Wikipedia
 
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M.S. Islam

Ad Honorem
Jul 2012
3,333
Dhaka
#6
Changes in the axial precession would not cause changes as rapid as what we are seeing today. The changes would be on a geological timescale.
Could it be that the axis deviated from its normal cycle, may be a few minutes or a degree off? May be as we are moving away from the center of the galaxy we experience lesser gravitational pull, and thus the change in motion? It would then be another factor in global warming, as well as the man made one.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,030
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#7
Could it be that the axis deviated from its normal cycle, may be a few minutes or a degree off? May be as we are moving away from the center of the galaxy we experience lesser gravitational pull, and thus the change in motion? It would then be another factor in global warming, as well as the man made one.
Even if it did, the changes would happen over a span of millennia, not decades. There are no nearby sources of gravity large enough to affect the Earth's axis of rotation in that manner.

@Whyte
 
Likes: Kotromanic
Mar 2019
1,612
Kansas
#9
Could it be that the axis deviated from its normal cycle, may be a few minutes or a degree off? May be as we are moving away from the center of the galaxy we experience lesser gravitational pull, and thus the change in motion? It would then be another factor in global warming, as well as the man made one.
No, Axle tilt is generally only affected by hitting a planet with something. Example the 23.5 degree tilt the Earth has is an artifact of Earth being hit by something back at the very beginnings of the Solar System