Charles Lutwidge Dogson: Typical Victorian, or an Oddity?

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,635
Las Vegas, NV USA
What is a typical Victorian? There were more than a few changes between 1837 and 1901. Like many people I'm familiar with Alice in Wonderland. I don't find this kind of story of out place in Victorian England. Indeed I think it could have only come out of Victorian England.
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,635
Las Vegas, NV USA
I tend to confuse the Queen of Hearts and the Red Queen. The Queen of Hearts in Alice is thought by some to be Queen Victoria or Queen Elizabeth I. Victoria is not known to have chopped off anyone's head but writers are allowed creative license.
 
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Feb 2019
905
Pennsylvania, US
In some ways you could say that he truly was an oddity - the sort of hallucinations he had where he (and elements around him) shifted in size were thought to be part of the migraines he suffered. Usually after having visual migraine symptoms (auras), he would experience hallucinations, derealization, and hyperschematia/hyposchematia. During the era when Carroll was alive, very little was known about migraines and the neurological symptoms that would accompany episodes... today, only about 10% of the population will experience a few episodes of what Carroll felt - which was Todd's disease, also known now as Alice in Wonderland Syndrome. Of migraine sufferers, only 20% have the auditory/visual hallucinations, sensations of levitation, auras, etc... In a sense, his symptoms would make him a bit of an oddity...

In true Victorian fashion, Carroll was at times medicated with laudanum... which may have added to his overall otherworldly "experience". :lol:
 
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Oct 2015
370
Belfast
Possible stoner. In Victorian times, opium was available from the apothecary as an "over the counter" medicine. It was very cheap, priced at a penny a pinch.
 
Feb 2019
905
Pennsylvania, US
Possible stoner. In Victorian times, opium was available from the apothecary as an "over the counter" medicine. It was very cheap, priced at a penny a pinch.
The recreational drug use theories aren't really substantiated... I kinda think the 1960's drug culture appropriated Lewis Carroll in ways that really aren't historically accurate.

If we look at every person in the past who was prescribed and/ or abused opiates for ailments, it would be a long, long list with very productive and focused individuals on it... Carroll's vantage point most likely had more to do with his limitless imagination and experiences with neurological disease (visual migraine).