chernobyl what the did with victims, which got lethal dose of radiation ?

Jul 2018
2
czech repiblic
I am watching chernobyl tv show. And i wanted to know. What they did with victims which got lethal dose of radiation and would be dead in week. Because there is scene gruesome scene of fireman dying from radiation in hospital. I don't see a reason why they would keep him alive. This is just awful and cruel torture...
 

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,692
Europe
Which TV show are you watching? Is it the current HBO/BBC one, being aired now? Is it a drama?


There have been a few Chernobyl documentaries. These two are on YouTube

Seconds From Disaster /Mega Disasters-Meltdown at Chernobyl
and
Chernobyl Heritage
 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
Which TV show are you watching? Is it the current HBO/BBC one, being aired now? Is it a drama?
He suggests that he is watching the one Sky Atlantic. Tonight is episode 3. It's a drama with very many well known british TV actors. It's an excellent production which started with the denial and cover up after the initial exposion.
 
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authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,219
I am watching chernobyl tv show. And i wanted to know. What they did with victims which got lethal dose of radiation and would be dead in week. Because there is scene gruesome scene of fireman dying from radiation in hospital. I don't see a reason why they would keep him alive. This is just awful and cruel torture...
Remember, the hospital workers did not know what caused the burns. They were told that radiation levels were acceptable and were working on the basis that they were fire burns. Anyone who suspected otherwise, kept their mouths shut for fear of being denounced. They weren't even giving the staff iodine tablets, which stop the thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive particles. No reason to panic and anyone causing a panic will be arrested.

This is always the problem with military or dictatorial authorities. This is a photo of american troops searching for and finding uranium cubes used in the experimental atomic reactor in Haigerloch in Germany. The germans hid it as the americans advanced and the americans wanted it for their own atomic project. Although not as enriched as the uranium at Chernobyl, it was still deadly.

 
Aug 2014
302
New York, USA
Remember, the hospital workers did not know what caused the burns. They were told that radiation levels were acceptable and were working on the basis that they were fire burns. Anyone who suspected otherwise, kept their mouths shut for fear of being denounced. They weren't even giving the staff iodine tablets, which stop the thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive particles. No reason to panic and anyone causing a panic will be arrested.
Keep in mind that before Chernobyl, nobody really knew the full extent of extensive radiation damage or treatments or if it even can be treated. As far as I know, they were trying to keep some people alive as long as possible and catalogue what is actually going on/symptoms and effects.
Similar to what happened in the late 90s in Japan, when they kept Hisashi Ouchi alive for 83 days (against his will) to try various experimental treatments, including stem cells, on him. I believe in that case, all his chromosomes and DNA were destroyed and they kept resuscitating him.

Practically everything we know in medical literature about severe radiation exposure came from Chernobyl victims and Hisashi Ouchi, as these kinds of cases are very rare. They are also of great interest to governments, military, and the medical field.
 
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Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,630
The most seriously affected were moved to a special unit in a hospital in Moscow where most eventually succumbed to the effects of acute radiation syndrome. It is an awful way to go.

There were people who were irradiated and survived however, including the deputy chief engineer who supervised the reactor test that resulted in the disaster.

Sick firefighters that were initially brought into the hospital in Pripyat had their uniforms and equipment (which were contaminated) removed, and the uniform items were discarded in the basement where they remain today in the ruins. Even today, decades after the disaster, the contaminated uniform items are emitting thousands of times of normal background radiation.

Skip to about 1:55.

 

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,630
The TV series is absolutely fantastic, though heartbreaking.

The characters of Vasily and Lyudmilla Ignatenko were real people.


"Lyudmilla Ignatenko
Wife of fireman Vasily Ignatenko

We were newlyweds. We still walked around holding hands, even if we were just going to the store. I would say to him, "I love you." But I didn't know then how much. I had no idea.

We lived in the dormitory of the fire station where he worked. There were three other young couples; we all shared a kitchen. On the ground floor they kept the trucks, the red fire trucks. That was his job.

One night I heard a noise. I looked out the window. He saw me. "Close the window and go back to sleep. There's a fire at the reactor. I'll be back soon."

I didn't see the explosion itself. Just the flames. Everything was radiant. The whole sky. A tall flame. And smoke. The heat was awful. And he's still not back. The smoke was from the burning bitumen, which had covered the roof. He said later it was like walking on tar.

They tried to beat down the flames. They kicked at the burning graphite with their feet ... They weren't wearing their canvas gear. They went off just as they were, in their shirt sleeves. No one told them.

At seven in the morning I was told he was in the hospital. I ran there but the police had already encircled it, and they weren't letting anyone through, only ambulances. The policemen shouted: "The ambulances are radioactive stay away!"

I saw him. He was all swollen and puffed up. You could barely see his eyes.

"He needs milk. Lots of milk," my friend said. "They should drink at least three litres each."

"But he doesn't like milk."

"He'll drink it now."

Many of the doctors and nurses in that hospital and especially the orderlies, would get sick themselves and die. But we didn't know that then.

I couldn't get into the hospital that evening. The doctor came out and said, yes, they were flying to Moscow, but we needed to bring them their clothes. The clothes they'd worn at the station had been burned. The buses had stopped running already and we ran across the city. We came running back with their bags, but the plane was already gone. They tricked us.

It was a special hospital, for radiology, and you couldn't get in without a pass. I gave some money to the woman at the door, and she said, "Go ahead." Then I had to ask someone else, beg. Finally I'm sitting in the office of the head radiologist. Right away she asked: "Do you have kids?" What should I tell her? I can see already that I need to hide that I'm pregnant. They won't let me see him! It's good I'm thin, you can't really tell anything.

"Yes," I say.

"How many?" I'm thinking, I need to tell her two. If it's just one, she won't let me in.

"A boy and a girl."

"So you don't need to have any more. All right, listen: his central nervous system is completely compromised, his skull is completely compromised."

OK, I'm thinking, so he'll be a little fidgety.

"And listen: if you start crying, I'll kick you out right away. No hugging or kissing. Don't even get near him. You have half an hour."

He looks so funny, he's got pyjamas on for a size 48, and he's a size 52. The sleeves are too short, the trousers are too short. But his face isn't swollen any more. They were given some sort of fluid. I say, "Where'd you run off to?" He wants to hug me. The doctor won't let him. "Sit, sit," she says. "No hugging in here."

On the very first day in the dormitory they measured me with a dosimeter. My clothes, bag, purse, shoes - they were all "hot". And they took that all away from me right there. Even my underwear. The only thing they left was my money.

He started to change; every day I met a brand-new person. The burns started to come to the surface. In his mouth, on his tongue, his cheeks - at first there were little lesions, and then they grew. It came off in layers - as white film ... the colour of his face ... his body ... blue, red , grey-brown. And it's all so very mine!

The only thing that saved me was it happened so fast; there wasn't any time to think, there wasn't any time to cry. It was a hospital for people with serious radiation poisoning. Fourteen days. In 14 days a person dies.

He was producing stools 25 to 30 times a day, with blood and mucous. His skin started cracking on his arms and legs. He became covered with boils. When he turned his head, there'd be a clump of hair left on the pillow. I tried joking: "It's convenient, you don't need a comb." Soon they cut all their hair.

I tell the nurse: "He's dying." And she says to me: "What did you expect? He got 1,600 roentgen. Four hundred is a lethal dose. You're sitting next to a nuclear reactor."

When they all died, they refurbished the hospital. They scraped down the walls and dug up the parquet. When he died, they dressed him up in formal wear, with his service cap. They couldn't get shoes on him because his feet had swollen up. They buried him barefoot. My love."

Extract: Voices from Chernobyl by Svetlana Alexievich