China in crisis?

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,397
China
PRC currently hosts ~300,000 refugees, among which, ~200,000 are ethnically connected with han, most of the rest are connected with jing, i.e. the same ethinic group as those in vietnam. and then ~100 from somalia. some tens to hundreds combined together from some other countries.

obviously the recent refugee waves in EU cannot reach china using their most common migration paths.
while refugees in PRC all came from applicants via UN.

so it is mainly an arrange issue from UN, and also which largely determined by the wishes of the applicants themselves.

as for the recent refugees waves in europe, it is a result of geography, and the "open door" policies of EU.
also, it is a result of the wars which NATO involved.

since UN was not actively involved on the arrangement of those people (as UN was excluded from the decisions of NATO), applicant usually do not choose UN to enter china. and that means they cannot enter china.

sure, if they can swim over, i guess we will welcome them.
not trying to play smart, but there are reasons they choose targets.
 
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Likes: robto
Aug 2014
3,793
Australia
China is going to suffer the effects of a shrinking workforce just like many other countries because of its low fertility rate. Immigration is acting as a stop gap measure but eventually those people will also get old and retire, so immigration only works if the number of immigrants increases each year indefinitely. Japan is trying to solve the problem through automation but they have realised that it isn't enough and have recently relaxed their restrictions on immigration.
 

heylouis

Ad Honorem
Apr 2013
6,397
China
no idea what is the point linking work force and immigrants.

if a nation gets too few babies, filling in immigrants won't stop the problem, unless the immigrants replace the original population.

but again, even for a middle size nation, how many immigrants that would require?

japan did not relax on immigrations, they only made it simpler for temporary workers (they go in and go out again in a not long time).
 
Jul 2016
958
Dengie Peninsula
This is a good subject! How can you fill a country with the right number of immigrants , without causing complaints from the indigenous population, most of whom do not understand why immigrants are let in, in the first place?
 
Feb 2011
6,148
China's retirement age is pretty low, 60 for men and 50 for women, and they kept it this low because of unemployment. Raising the retirement age is probably the simplest course of action to solve the workforce problem, so I suspect that's what will happen in the future. And of course there's automation. China's really behind in the amount of robotics per capita (about 50 robots per 10,000 workers as opposed to 70 for the global average), so any amount of investment in robotics would have greater impact than that same amount in more advanced countries such as Japan.

Allowing any sort of mass immigration would mean that the government needs to do a lot of explaining over making their people go through the one child policy. Plus the amount of population is quickly drying up China's rivers anyways. Whatever problems that's caused by a shrinking workforce, it pales in comparison to dried up rivers that cities and farms depended on for livelihood.
 
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Aug 2014
3,793
Australia

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,281
Brassicaland
Pollution is hardly to clean off than polluting; hence the importance of environmental protection.
Saying that China is NOT overpopulated is perhaps a major misconception.

China's retirement age is pretty low, 60 for men and 50 for women, and they kept it this low because of unemployment. Raising the retirement age is probably the simplest course of action to solve the workforce problem, so I suspect that's what will happen in the future. And of course there's automation. China's really behind in the amount of robotics per capita (about 50 robots per 10,000 workers as opposed to 70 for the global average), so any amount of investment in robotics would have greater impact than that same amount in more advanced countries such as Japan.

Allowing any sort of mass immigration would mean that the government needs to do a lot of explaining over making their people go through the one child policy. Plus the amount of population is quickly drying up China's rivers anyways. Whatever problems that's caused by a shrinking workforce, it pales in comparison to dried up rivers that cities and farms depended on for livelihood.
China may witness a fairly massive death boom sooner or later; then, most of the added population is since 1949, and the average life expectancy is way beyond 70.
Let's assume a fairly substantial death and retirement boom in the next 20 years; will it cripple the financial ability of any governments?
 
Aug 2014
3,793
Australia
China may witness a fairly massive death boom sooner or later; then, most of the added population is since 1949, and the average life expectancy is way beyond 70. Let's assume a fairly substantial death and retirement boom in the next 20 years; will it cripple the financial ability of any governments?
Depends who dies. If it is unproductive demographics such as the unemployed or the retired then it will benefit the economy. If it is the worker demographic then the economic repercussions become serious.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,281
Brassicaland
Depends who dies. If it is unproductive demographics such as those who are retired then it will benefit the economy. If it is the worker demographic then the economic repercussions become serious.
The problem is that pollution and stressful lifestyle lead to a cancer epidermic and is killing quite a bit of the worker demographic.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,561
Sydney
The most probable stressor , beside pollution and over use , is the rise in life expectancy ,\
this will lead , like in every other post industrial society ,to a great rise in older citizen ,
this is serious ,
Russia had to increase the pension age from it's communist standard , with ferocious protest
western Europe is groaning under the cost of pension and medical support for its aging population
the US debt projection for its social security commitment are more than they can ever expect to pay

the cost of welfare for the old is more than can be afforded , is there a solution ?
.....I don't know