Chinese Mountain Pattern Armor

Oct 2013
4,567
Canada
#11
This is clearly an a priori consideration that he could not believe that the ancient Chinese would wear such an armour. His report ends in the middle of it, so we do not know if he ever came to a different conclusion.

Logically, any armour which has large overlaps of its protective parts is heavier than the optimal without offering more protection, as the weakest links define the overall protective capability.
As I said his conclusion was that it was flexible.

Shan wen kia scale armour

Update Feb. 2003 (Has it been that long?). After moving to a new city, I pulled these scales out again about a year ago. Along with armourer Klangiron, I made up a test patch of these scales. They worked out better than I had hoped, though there was some labor to shape each scale. Again, these plates are ugly, but the overall effect is pretty cool. The interlocking tabs do their jobs perfectly, so the scale is flexible, but when wrapped around a limb, they become rigid and defend against impact. I'm working again on this project, and hope to have a working armour panel soon to test in SCA fighting.
 
Feb 2011
1,595
#12
Ah cool, thanks. He seems pretty content with it, although he does (and cannot, given the small patch) make any statement concerning the weight issue.

From his close-up shot it is also clear that his reconstructed scales are far from tight. Perhaps not wide enough for a sword to penetrate, but the tip of a javelin or arrow might work its way through it upon impact.
 
Aug 2014
4,473
Australia
#15
From his close-up shot it is also clear that his reconstructed scales are far from tight. Perhaps not wide enough for a sword to penetrate, but the tip of a javelin or arrow might work its way through it upon impact.
Not really. There is a second layer of metal behind it. There is nowhere in the construction where a point would not find at least one layer of metal.
 
Feb 2011
1,595
#16
I see 4-5 gaps between the interlocking scales where the padding can be clearly seen.

At the same time other parts are triple-protected. This is not terribly efficient.
 
Aug 2014
4,473
Australia
#17
That image above does resemble 山. That is pretty neat. You always have fascinating posts about these things. Thank you for sharing.
Nobody could come up with a sensible explanation as to why it was called "mountain pattern armour" until Mr Slone suggested that it might be the shape of the scales. It seems reasonable to me.
 
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Oct 2014
5,123
On the prowl.
#18
Nobody could come up with a sensible explanation as to why it was called "mountain pattern armour" until Mr Slone suggested that it might be the shape of the scales. It seems reasonable to me.
It does make sense. I have never been all that interested in armor or things like this. However, there are languages where there is more to it rather than just the literal definition of the word itself. In English, we use definitions that describe our letters as well, as in a "T intersection" (resembles a "T").
 
Oct 2013
6,266
Planet Nine, Oregon
#20

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