Churchill, Stalin, Truman, Mao and the pivotal years

May 2019
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I refer to the time period from 1946 to 1949 as the pivotal years because lots of things happened that would shape geopolitics and future international relations. (I can give some examples if anyone should need them). What led to the deterioration of relations between these guys? Were any mistakes made and could things have gone differently?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,724
SoCal
The Soviet domination of Eastern Europe certainly didn't help matters. Once it became clear that the Soviets were uninterested in bringing/returning freedom and democracy to Eastern Europe, Western attitudes towards the USSR significantly hardened.
 
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May 2019
122
Northern and Western hemispheres
The Soviet domination of Eastern Europe certainly didn't help matters. Once it became clear that the Soviets were uninterested in bringing/returning freedom and democracy to Eastern Europe, Western attitudes towards the USSR significantly hardened.
Nope, Josef Stalin blocking free elections in central and east europe didn't do any favors and further sank his reputation point score. He was likely afraid paranoid about Churchill and Truman attempting to do an Operation Barbarossa 2.0 which never came. Churchill and Truman were likely paranoid about Stalin either trying to invade more European countries (which based on his actions in the late 30s and early 40s wasn't an unreasonable fear) and stir up communists that could potentially come to power in Western European countries.

I think that blaming only one player for the breakup of the anti-hitler and mussolini coalition is narrow minded. My view that Churchill, Stalin, and Truman all were to blame.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,724
SoCal
Nope, Josef Stalin blocking free elections in central and east europe didn't do any favors and further sank his reputation point score. He was likely afraid paranoid about Churchill and Truman attempting to do an Operation Barbarossa 2.0 which never came. Churchill and Truman were likely paranoid about Stalin either trying to invade more European countries (which based on his actions in the late 30s and early 40s wasn't an unreasonable fear) and stir up communists that could potentially come to power in Western European countries.

I think that blaming only one player for the breakup of the anti-hitler and mussolini coalition is narrow minded. My view that Churchill, Stalin, and Truman all were to blame.
Fair enough, I suppose.
 
Mar 2019
1,801
Kansas
I think that blaming only one player for the breakup of the anti-hitler and mussolini coalition is narrow minded. My view that Churchill, Stalin, and Truman all were to blame.
Well Stalin did not trust the Western Allies and they didn't do much to help that

Churchill didn't trust Stalin and Stalin never did anything the help that

Truman had the bomb, so he didn't need to care about trust.
 
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May 2019
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Good post. Mutual mistrust among the Allied leaders was a key factor. If the Americans had stayed out of ww2 in the European Theater I still think that there would be a deterioration of relations between Churchill and Stalin.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,724
SoCal
Good post. Mutual mistrust among the Allied leaders was a key factor. If the Americans had stayed out of ww2 in the European Theater I still think that there would be a deterioration of relations between Churchill and Stalin.
If the Americans had stayed out of WWII in the European theater, I suspect that D-Day would have been a failure and thus the USSR might have felt compelled to make a compromise peace with Nazi Germany.
 
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Mar 2019
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Kansas
If the Americans had stayed out of WWII in the European theater, I suspect that D-Day would have been a failure and thus the USSR might have felt compelled to make a compromise peace with Nazi Germany.
No chance. The only thing that changes is the war drags a lot longer and most of Europe speaks Russian
 
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May 2019
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No chance. The only thing that changes is the war drags a lot longer and most of Europe speaks Russian
I mostly agree with you here. While American involvement in the European Theater can hardly be described as small scale it likely would have been a war that Hitler and Mussolini still would have eventually lost if FDR had stayed out. It would likely have dragged on for a few or several more years and their would have been a much larger Warsaw Pact that went all the way to the coast of France or maybe to the Portuguese coast. In the summer of 1948 instead of the Olympiv Games London is being bombarded with more advanced German rockets. A V-E Day is around the fall of 1948 or 1949.