Communism missed in Eastern Europe.

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Closed
Nov 2012
172
#1
At the end of 2011, some 22 years after the fall of the communist regime, Romania seems to be going through what is probably the deepest economic and social crisis of its post-communist existence. In this context, many Romanians seem to be displaying a certain appreciation for different attributes related to the communist regime or ideology. This appreciation is always interpreted as nostalgia for the communist past and/or regime.

The most incredible result was registered in a July 2010 IRES (Romanian Institute for Evaluation and Strategy) poll, according to which 41% of the respondents would have voted for Ceausescu, had he run for the position of president. And 63% of the survey participants said their life was better during communism, while only 23% attested that their life was worse then. Some 68% declared that communism was a good idea, just one that had been poorly applied.
In Romania, Opinion Polls Show Nostalgia for Communism - Romania

Glorification of the German Democratic Republic is on the rise two decades after the Berlin Wall fell. Young people and the better off are among those rebuffing criticism of East Germany as an "illegitimate state." In a new poll, more than half of former eastern Germans defend the GDR.

Today, 20 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, 57 percent, or an absolute majority, of eastern Germans defend the former East Germany. "The GDR had more good sides than bad sides. There were some problems, but life was good there," say 49 percent of those polled. Eight percent of eastern Germans flatly oppose all criticism of their former home and agree with the statement: "The GDR had, for the most part, good sides. Life there was happier and better than in reunified Germany today."
Homesick for a Dictatorship: Majority of Eastern Germans Feel Life Better under Communism - SPIEGEL ONLINE

A remarkable 72% of Hungarians say that most people in their country are actually worse off today economically than they were under communism. Only 8% say most people in Hungary are better off, and 16% say things are about the same. In no other Central or Eastern European country surveyed did so many believe that economic life is worse now than during the communist era. This is the result of almost universal displeasure with the economy. Fully 94% describe the country's economy as bad, the highest level of economic discontent in the hard hit region of Central and Eastern Europe. Just 46% of Hungarians approve of their country's switch from a state-controlled economy to a market economy; 42% disapprove of the move away from communism. The public is even more negative toward Hungary's integration into Europe; 71% say their country has been weakened by the process.
Hungary: Better Off Under Communism? | Pew Research Center

Roughly 28 percent of Czechs say they were better off under the Communist regime, according to a poll conducted by the polling institute SC&C and released Sunday.

Only 23 percent said they had a better life now.

More goods in shops, open borders and better cultural offer are considered the biggest successes of the system that was installed after 1989.

On the other hand, the voucher privatisation, the worsening of human relations and work of the civil service are its biggest flaws, most Czechs said.
Poll: Many Czechs say they had better life under Communism | Prague Monitor

A poll shows that as many as 81 per cent of Serbians believe they lived best in the former Yugoslavia -"during the time of socialism".

The survey focused on the respondents' views on the transition "from socialism to capitalism", and a clear majority said they trusted social institutions the most during the rule of Yugoslav communist president Josip Broz Tito.
The standard of living during Tito's rule from the Second World War to the 1980s was also assessed as best, whereas the Milosevic decade of the 1990s, and the subsequent decade since the fall of his regime are seen as "more or less the same".

45 percent said they trusted social institutions most under communism with 23 percent chosing the 2001-2003 period when Zoran Djinđic was prime minister. Only 19 per cent selected present-day institutions.
Serbia Poll: Life Was Better Under Tito :: Balkan Insight

According to Yale Lecturer Richard Pipes, 74% of Russians surveyed for his 2005 book regret the demise of the Soviet Union and believe life was better under Communism.

78% of respondents in a 2003 survey said that democracy is a facade for a government controlled by rich and powerful cliques. Only 22% expressed a preference for democracy; 53% disliked it.

74% of Russians regret the Soviet Union's passing. Only 12% regard the post-communist regime as "legitimate". In an October 2003 survey they were asked how they would react to a Communist coup: 23% would actively support it, 19 would collaborate, only 10% would actively resist.
Statistics taken from "Flight from Freedom: What Russians Think and Want" by Richard Pipes, published in the May/June 2004 issue of Foreign Affairs

The tired Western myth that life in the Eastern Bloc was nightmarish and the population lived in constant fear and borderline starvation begins to unravel as soon as one talks to people who actually lived in that era.

Only Poland, the Baltic states, and Galicia have a negative view of their communist past- most Eastern Europeans adopt a balanced approach, and Russians overwhelmingly view it in a positive light.
 
Dec 2012
126
Sydney, Australia
#2
I don't think it's all that worrying. I highly doubt any of those countries will experience a communist revolution or anything like it.
nostalgia plays a large part in it, its not a serious movement.
 

Belloc

Ad Honorem
Mar 2010
5,418
USA
#3
I don't think it's all that worrying. I highly doubt any of those countries will experience a communist revolution or anything like it.
nostalgia plays a large part in it, its not a serious movement.
Indeed, if polls were done about how many actually wanted a Communist government back in power, I don't think we'd find majority support.
 
Sep 2012
58
#4
I don't think it's all that worrying. I highly doubt any of those countries will experience a communist revolution or anything like it.
nostalgia plays a large part in it, its not a serious movement.
While I don't think its very serious, I would say in some cases its more then nostalgia. I've heard a similar poll being done in Ukraine (I couldnt find it with a quick google search), one of the main points it brough up was, that (in Ukraine at least), current GDP was lower then it was during the time they were part of the USSR.

After the collapse of the USSR, Ukraine went through a very harsh 8 year recession. Followed by 9 years of growth, then the current global recession we are now in. From their experience, it could seem to them that a market based economy, spends more time in a recession, then out of it.
 

Vaeltaja

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
3,690
#6
People should be very careful when reading results from the polls since the polls only answer explicitly and solely to the questions asked in the poll. They are not open to extrapolations from the said answers. And as far as i can see none of the studies answered to question 'if people missed communism'.
 
Dec 2012
87
Nicosia, Cyprus
#8
While I don't think its very serious, I would say in some cases its more then nostalgia. I've heard a similar poll being done in Ukraine (I couldnt find it with a quick google search), one of the main points it brough up was, that (in Ukraine at least), current GDP was lower then it was during the time they were part of the USSR.

After the collapse of the USSR, Ukraine went through a very harsh 8 year recession. Followed by 9 years of growth, then the current global recession we are now in. From their experience, it could seem to them that a market based economy, spends more time in a recession, then out of it.
Was in Kiev a few days ago and I asked the 50 year old taxi driver :"can you recommend a good place to have lunch?" You know where he took me? To a soviet nostalgia restaurant.

I was not bad actually. :) It was also full of young people.
 
Mar 2010
3,660
Czechoslovakia
#9
I believe the situation is more complicated than it looks:).

Truth is the preferences of commie party growing in recent years but why?

Velvet revolution started because people of Czechoslovakia were disgusted by commie policy. The situation is the same or maybe even worse today. Current right wing government has support only about of 8% of people but they totally ignore these numbers.

Next fact is commies never stopped to rule this country. Current politicians are former commies or kids of former commie elites. So if Czechs listen warnings of right wing politicians from commies it sounds pretty hypocrytic.
Petr Necas, current prime minister (ODS-right wing) was a member of commie youth organization.

I doubt people want communism back but terrible corruption, total incompetency and arrogancy pressing people to compare current and past times what is very dangerous.

Lets imagine the politician who stolen 500 billions of Czech crowns is being moved to even more lucrative position instead of arresting. These are very wrong signals about functional democracy and law in this land. This pressing many people to ask: which commies are more dangerous? Left wing commies or the right wing commies?
 
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