Communist/Socialist Reality in Eastern Europe after 1991

Nov 2016
80
Serbia
#12
There are a lot of older people who are apologetic about old times - but you can't be sure are they mourning their passed younger days or socialism itself.

Younger people don't care - those among them who feel pressed with ugly face of capitalism restauration (so-calles and never-ending "transition" and "reforms") think more about emigration and not about socialism as solution.
 

royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,944
San Antonio, Tx
#13
Socialism leads to Communism.
Always.

Bernie Sanders is no genius. The system is the same everywhere.
Bernie Sanders is not referring to “socialism as a means to Communism’ which is very different from Sanders’ position on issues. Sanders is much more like “Social Democracy” where national industries are NOT owned by the state. This is much more like Western Europe where even some of the national railroads are now owned by private industry. So Sanders is a “social democrat” and those geniuses in the old Soviet Union are socialists in the mold of Stalin (which was really just dictatorship).
 
Aug 2015
3,671
Slovenia
#15
I'm very curious what the reality in post cold war eastern European nations is regarding the apologetic's or even existence of communist or hard line Marxist socialist parties is. What I mean is, how would the average citizen in Poland, Romania, ex-Czechoslovakia, Baltic countries etc. react or how they react to Marxism, those who deny or downplay soviet-communist crimes against humanity?
In my parts commies reinvented themselves as a deep state, a mafia.
 
Jan 2014
1,994
Santiago de Chile
#16
Thanks for the answers. I am aware Poles in particular find communism distasteful. I wonder if any of these countries have denial laws or something along the effect. The communists (literal Chilean Communist party) here are campaigning for it to be illegal to deny in any capacity the crimes against humanity during Pinochet's regime, somewhat similar to what some European countries have regarding Nazism. Odd thing we also had a 'transition' (Pinochet's regime's end coincided with the fall of the iron curtain 1989) so we transitioned to a democracy (capitalist though).
 
Dec 2017
262
Regnum Teutonicum
#17
@Futurist
I don't know for Scandinavia, but of course socialism didn't lead to communism in West Germany, because there was no socialist party big enough to build a parliamentary faction in the west german parliament before 1990 (when the SED aka PDS aka Die Linke entered). There may have been one or two socialist congressmen, but no socialist party with influence. The parties large enough to build parliamentary factions were: CDU (center; conservative), CSU (center; conservative), SPD (center left; social democrat), FDP (liberal [not the american liberal]; pro business), Die Grünen (left; greens), Bayernpartei (center right; extrem federalist to seperatist), DP (right, national conservative), KPD (far left extremist, communist), WAV (populist), Zentrum (center, conservative) and GB/BHE (client politics politics for the expelled). So no big socialist party, only one communist, which was banned in 1956.
 
Oct 2013
13,486
Europix
#18
Oh. Trust me this is far away from the truth.
Communism is actually gaining a lot of ground lately in South-East Europe. It's valid for the rest of Europe as well.
Actually, almost every party today in Europe is heavily left orientated.
[...]

I guess the situation is even worse the further East you go.

There is a new wave of Socialism flooding over Europe. It ain't going well.
Yeah, do tell me more about it:


(blue = right, red = left, pink = communist)
 

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