Compilation of medieval (English or French) noble holdings?

Jul 2019
848
New Jersey
I was wondering if anybody knows of a reference work which describes in detail the lands of the medieval nobility? For example, how could I find all the holdings of the Mowbrays in 12th century England? Does such a work even exist?
 
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Jun 2017
629
maine
Several years ago, I made up maps of the Douglas holdings in Scotland; I had to dig through descriptions in deeds and old documents. England may be easier. If you can access the big single volume of Burke's Peerage (or the like), it should contain some kind of breakdown.

Land research in any country (including US) is rarely simple.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
In regards to medieval French nobility, sometimes their land holdings can be deduced from their titles. For instance, the Dukes of Bourbon controlled the territory known as the Bourbonnais. Meanwhile, the Dukes of Brittany controlled Brittany, the Counts of Artois controlled the County of Artois, the et cetera.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,930
This could be a start?
Guillaume de Montbray, one of the Plantagenet vassals (lord of Montbray) in Normandy, is known as Mowbray in England, lord of Axholme in Lincoln.
 
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Jul 2019
848
New Jersey
Several years ago, I made up maps of the Douglas holdings in Scotland; I had to dig through descriptions in deeds and old documents. England may be easier. If you can access the big single volume of Burke's Peerage (or the like), it should contain some kind of breakdown.

Land research in any country (including US) is rarely simple.
I have access to Burke’s peerage. The problem is that many of the biggest Norman families died out long before them. Mowbray was swallowed by Howard, Bohun died out in the 14th century, and so on. But I suppose you’re right that it’s my best option.
 
Jun 2017
629
maine
I have access to Burke’s peerage. The problem is that many of the biggest Norman families died out long before them. Mowbray was swallowed by Howard, Bohun died out in the 14th century, and so on. But I suppose you’re right that it’s my best option.
There is a companion book, Burke's Extinct Peerages. In England, histories often cover landholdings--and their transfer. Sometime there is a family history that will cover land possessions (now if the time to familiarize yourself with a large genealogical library); I have a copy of The Thrales of Streatham Park which is largely genealogical but which includes their holdings. Somewhere I have a biography of Waltheof and his family which includes detailed land discussions. It's hard to say exactly what's out there: I'd hit the online card catalogs (or even World Cat itself) and do a keyword search.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
It's clearly before the 12th century, but the Doomsday book ought to be at last a starting point?
Yep; indeed, here is a site that appears to have a free version of the Domesday (not Doomsday!) Book online:

 
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