continuous Spanish-speaking counties of the modern day United States

Sep 2017
27
Philippines
#1
are there any counties of the modern day United States, that have been CONTINUOUSLY majority, or close to majority, Spanish speaking for the past 350-plus years?

if there are any, I'm not too sure where they, these CONTINUOUS Spanish speaking counties would likely be. I would guess, and it is only a guess, somewhere in Texas and not part of the 1848 Mexican Cession. But really, I have no idea. That is only a guess.

obviously, if such modern-day counties do exist, where a majority, or close to a majority, have spoken Spanish CONTINUOUSLY in all that time, then they are going to be somewhere in the former Spanish Empire, that is now part of the United States. That after it stopped being part of the Spanish Empire, became a part of Mexico and later, part of the United States.

I'm not talking about modern day counties that were FORMERLY majority English speaking, and have now become majority Spanish speaking. That is the more modern era. I'm thinking more along the lines, of CONTINUOUS Spanish speaking areas. Do they exist?

I realise that it's not a very cut-and-dried question. But basically the question is, which modern-day counties, or areas, in the US, have consistently spoken Spanish the most, and for the longest?
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,327
Las Vegas, NV USA
#2
This is a list of US counties with significant latino-hispanic populations. There are quite a few of them, in some cases over 90%. Those in New Mexico, Texas and California have the best chance of having continuous hispanic-latino Spanish speaking populations. How many are fluent in Spanish is not given, but in counties with over 80% there are likely to have many fluent Spanish speakers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._counties_with_Hispanic_or_Latino_majority_populations
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,212
#3
San Miguel, Guadalupe, and Mora Counties are contiguous east of Santa Fe, New Mexico. All have about 80% Hispanic population, and that percentage has been pretty constant for the last 50 years. They are almost certainly continuous majority Spanish speaking. Since schools and so on are in English, probably more people speak English fluently there than Spanish, if you want to look at it that way.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,212
#7
Imperial County, CA? It is 80% hispanic (see reference post 2) and on the Mexican border.
There are 15x as many people in Imperial County as in 1910. There were large numbers of migrant workers from Mexico, as well as Okies and so on moving in. I am not sure it was majority Hispanic in the late 19th century.
 
Mar 2012
18,030
In the bag of ecstatic squirt
#8
Are their local laws like ordinances written in Spanish too? What about the schools and court proceedings, are they in Spanish too?
 
Mar 2012
18,030
In the bag of ecstatic squirt
#10
^Okay, so that's the reason perhaps of the U.S. not declaring English as the official language because there is no necessity of doing such.
 

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