Corsica 1769-1794

Feb 2019
461
Serbia
#1
I'm wondering about what was happening to Corsica between the French conquest in 1769 and the British invasion in 1794. In 1794 the Corsican nationalists led by Pasquale Paoli accepted British rule and revolted against France. It seems that Corsican nationalism was alive during the period after the French invasion but what were the activities of the nationalists and how did Corsica function before 1794.
 
Mar 2016
1,079
Australia
#3
From what I recall reading during the first few chapters of Andrew Roberts' biography of Napoleon, Corsica was annexed directly to France and was made a department just like any other region of the country. They had some form of representation that reported to the King's ministers, and I believe Napoleon's father was one of these representatives since he was one of the highest ranking noblemen on Corsica. On the topic of nobility, anybody that could prove their noble blood was entitled to enrol in French schools and academies and be sponsored by the French government, which is how Napoleon was accepted into various French schools and military academies (although his Corsican background was still an object of mockery by the 'proper' French students). When the Revolution broke out, there was conflict in Corsica over whether they should remain loyal to the King, to the new republic, or to forge their own path as an independent republic. That's about the extent I know of things.
 
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Apr 2019
13
Paris
#4
I'm wondering about what was happening to Corsica between the French conquest in 1769 and the British invasion in 1794. In 1794 the Corsican nationalists led by Pasquale Paoli accepted British rule and revolted against France. It seems that Corsican nationalism was alive during the period after the French invasion but what were the activities of the nationalists and how did Corsica function before 1794.
I'm not sure that before Paoli there was a real corsican nationalism. I think it was a territory of peasants without strong political convictions, and at that time a lot of persons just obey to a king or a royal family. Besides, I don't think they ever been independant as before France they use to belong to Genova. Corsica also has a very reduced population (300,000 nowadays, so imagine in the 18th century) In any case, bear in mind that Napoleon was from Corsica, and since then this territory was without troubles associated to France.

Corsican nationalism recently reappeared.

But maybe a corsican person will provide a better explanation than mine.
 
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