Could evidence for the Big Bang possibly be some sort of illusionary effect by interstellar matter in the galaxy?

Oct 2017
383
America ??
Greetings.

Not sure whether I should post this thread in speculative or environmental history. Let me know what you think.

I well realise that modern scientists work under centuries build worth to form our current sophisticated careful scientific procedures & have no doubt that they are very smart people & know exactly what they’re doing, so am only sharing a hypothesis here.

Ive long thought that there’s probably not much way for humanity to prove what is definitively real beyond the solar system & even within is very limited due to not being able to study tangibly & exclusively relying on radiation mostly in form of light, & knowing the many ways radiation like light can be refracted & deflected right here on earth. Have a study of optics & radiation to find out more. There seems to be a common doubt about whether our constants & fundamentals in the cosmos applies universally elsewhere.

With this in mind, I’ve long wondered whether the main evidences for the Big Bang theory, being the cosmic background radiation, redshift & perception that the galaxies & space itself are moving apart, could possibly actually be some sort of illusionary effect made by interstellar matter in our galaxy. Science knows that galaxies like ours’ are full of interstellar matter in the form of gas & dust. There’s also dark matter & energy which is clearly detectable to be having an effect on regular matter that we can directly see. Why wouldn’t they have an optical effect on our perception of deeper space?

What do you think?
 

MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,364
Kansas
With this in mind, I’ve long wondered whether the main evidences for the Big Bang theory, being the cosmic background radiation, redshift & perception that the galaxies & space itself are moving apart, could possibly actually be some sort of illusionary effect made by interstellar matter in our galaxy. Science knows that galaxies like ours’ are full of interstellar matter in the form of gas & dust. There’s also dark matter & energy which is clearly detectable to be having an effect on regular matter that we can directly see. Why wouldn’t they have an optical effect on our perception of deeper space?

What do you think?
The amount of dust gas etc that is in the way of a particular observation is noted in EVERY scientific astronomical paper. It called absorption or extinction. And understanding the effects of this is critical to our understanding of the universe. In some parts of the galaxy this absorption is so bad we have blind spots, referred to as zones of avoidance.

The good news is over time we have developed a number of techniques to tell exactly how much off this crud is messing with our observations, and adjust our findings accordingly.