Could Germanic tribes have settled in West Asia in the history, stayed there and assimilated into West Asian culture?

Aug 2019
1
Germany
#1
I ask because I have made a myheritage DNA test and my results were:

42% Balkans
33% West Asia
13% Greece
7% Scandinavia
5% Central Asia

My West Asia component seems high and also, I’ve been to Turkey, which is in West Asia, and I am surprised that many people looked very Germanic to me. Maybe Germanics have settled there centuries ago but assimilated into West Asian culture as time went by?
 
Aug 2018
494
london
#4
The Goths invaded Anatolia. They also settled there as confederates of the Roman Empire. Goths also served as soldiers and generals in the Eastern Roman army, some became consuls.

Gothic invasion

A new problem for Anatolia emerged during this period, with the expansion of the Goths during the 3rd century. Since the roads to central Europe through Macedonia, Italy, and Germania were all defended successfully by the Romans, the Goths found Anatolia to be irresistible due to its wealth and deteriorating defenses. Using a captured fleet of ships from the Bosphorus and flat-bottomed boats to cross the Black Sea, they sailed from Black Sea bases (Black Sea Goths) in 255 during the reign of Valerian (253–260) around the eastern shores, landing in the coastal city of Trebizond in Pontus. What ensued was a huge embarrassment for Pontus- the wealth of the city was absconded, a larger number of ships were confiscated, and they entered the interior without much resistance. A second invasion of Anatolia through Bithynia brought even more terror inland and wanton destruction. They entered the city of Chalcedon, using it as a base by which to expand their operations, sacking Nicomedia, Prusa, Apamea, and Nicaea in turn.[56] Only the turn of the weather as winter approached kept them from penetrating further into Anatolia. However, the Goths continued their seaborn attacks not only around the coastline of Anatolia, but in Greece and Italy as well. Amongst their raids was the destruction of the Temple of Diana in Ephesus and the city itself in 263. Tacitus (275–276) successfully took on the Gothic invaders of Anatolia, and this was continued by a subsequent emperor, Probus (276–82).[57]

Classical Anatolia - Wikipedia


Tribigild was an Ostrogothic general whose rebellion against the Eastern Roman Empire precipitated a major political crisis during the reign of Emperor Arcadius. Tribigild appears in the historical record as the leader of a colony of Ostrogoths in Phrygia and a military confederate of the Roman state... In 399, his honour wounded by an insufficiently extravagant reception at the imperial court in Constantinople, he broke with Arcadius and began to sack the interior of Asia Minor. The resulting population upheavals and rumours of Tribigild's increasing power forced Arcadius's prime minister, the eunuch Eutropius, to send an expeditionary force across the Hellespont. In fact, Tribigild had met with increasing difficulty in fending off peasant militias, but when the imperial legions arrived he was easily able to subvert the loyalty of the fellow barbarians that were the fighting core of the force and scatter the rest. This left fellow Goth Gainas in control of Constantinople's military fate; sent against Tribigild (who may have been a kinsman), he returned to report that the rebel was insurmountable and that negotiation would be the safest tactic. A demand for the lifeblood of Eutropius, perhaps negotiated in advance by Gainas and Tribigild, was met. But Gainas soon overplayed his hand and allied openly with his rebel cousin, and Tribigild was apparently killed during the combined Gothic army's movement toward Constantinople.

Tribigild - Wikipedia
 
Last edited:
Aug 2018
494
london
#5
Gainas was a Gothic leader who served the Eastern Roman Empire as magister militum during the reigns of Theodosius I and Arcadius. Gainas began his military career as a common foot-soldier, but later commanded the barbarian contingent of Theodosius' army against the usurper Eugenius in 394. Under the command of Gainas, a man of "no lineage", was the young Alaric of the Balti dynasty.[1] In 395, Stilicho sent him with his troops, under the cover of strengthening the armies of the East, to depose the prefect Rufinus, who was hostile to Stilicho.[2] Gainas murdered Rufinus, but proceeded to join the eunuch Eutropius, who was likewise Stilicho's enemy. Gainas assumed a high place in the administration of the Eastern Roman Empire, controlled by Eudoxia, Arcadius' wife, and Eutropius, his favorite.[3]

In 399 he replaced magister militum Leo after the latter failed to quell the insurrection of the Ostrogoths in Asia Minor, led by the chieftain Tribigild. Gainas too failed to put down the invasions; according to some sources,[4] Gainas was conspiring with Tribigild in order to effect the downfall of Eutropius, who by now was on bad terms with Gainas. After suffering repeated failures against the Ostrogoths, who continued devastating the provinces of Asia Minor, Gainas advised Arcadius to accept Tribigild's terms, which included the death of Eutropius. Gainas then showed his true colors, openly joining Tribigld with all his forces; he forced Arcadius to sign a treaty whereby the Goths would be allowed to settle in Thrace, entrusted with the defense of that frontier against the barbarians beyond the Danube.[5]Gainas proceeded to install his forces in Constantinople, where he ruled for several months. He attempted in effect to copy the success of Stilicho in the West and posed a danger to the survival of the Eastern Roman Empire. He deposed all the anti-Goth officials and had Eutropius executed, though he had previously only been banished; after the intervention of St. John Chrysostom the others were spared.[6]

While a somewhat competent military commander, the zealous Arian Gainas was patently unable to administer a city of 200-400,000 whose Graeco-Roman populace intensely resented barbarian Goths and Arian Christians. Gainas' compromises with Tribigild led to rumors that he had colluded with Tribigild, his kinsman;[7] when he returned to Constantinople in 400, riots broke out. He attempted to evacuate his soldiers but even then the citizens of Constantinople managed to trap and kill 7,000 armed Goths, spurred to action by the Empress Aelia Eudoxia.[6] In response, Gainas and his forces attempted to flee back across the Hellespont, but their rag-tag ad hoc fleet was met and destroyed by another Goth in Imperial service, Fravitta, who was subsequently made consul for 401 but was later accused of treason and executed as well. After this battle, Gainas fled across the Danube and was caught by the Huns under Uldin. Gainas was killed, and his head was sent by Uldin to Arcadius c. 400 as a diplomatic gift.[6]

Gainas - Wikipedia


Jordanes was a 6th-century Eastern Roman bureaucrat of Gothic extraction[2] who turned his hand to history later in life. Jordanes wrote Romana, about the history of Rome, but his best-known work is his Getica, which was written in Constantinople[3] about AD 551.[4] Along with Isidore of Seville's Historia Gothorum, it is one of only two extant ancient works dealing with the early history of the Goths.

Jordanes - Wikipedia
 
Aug 2018
494
london
#7
The Varangian Guard was an elite unit of the Byzantine Army from the tenth to the fourteenth century, whose members served as personal bodyguards to the Byzantine Emperors. The Varangian Guard was known for being primarily composed of recruits from northern Europe, including Norsemen from Scandinavia and Anglo-Saxons from England.[1] ...

The Varangian Guard not only provided security for the Byzantine emperors, but also participated in many wars, often playing a decisive role, since they were usually deployed at critical moments of a battle. By the late 13th century, Varangians were mostly ethnically assimilated by the Byzantine Greeks, though the Guard remained in existence until at least mid-14th century. In 1400, there were still some people identifying themselves as "Varangians" in Constantinople.

Varangian Guard - Wikipedia
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,061
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#8
I ask because I have made a myheritage DNA test and my results were:

42% Balkans
33% West Asia
13% Greece
7% Scandinavia
5% Central Asia

My West Asia component seems high and also, I’ve been to Turkey, which is in West Asia, and I am surprised that many people looked very Germanic to me. Maybe Germanics have settled there centuries ago but assimilated into West Asian culture as time went by?
The discussion of genetics is not permitted on Historum.
 

Similar History Discussions