Could Goryeo (Korea) have gained land through the Mongol Invasion of Japan?

#1
Reading a bit on Mongol Invasion of Japan, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol_invasions_of_Japan), I noticed something interesting.

The background is that Goryeo became a semi-autnonomous state of the Mongol Empire, and the Goryeo King gained certain privileges, like a a seat at the council, vote on the selection of Khans, and marrying the Mongol princess.

The Khan was willing to go to war as early as 1268 after having been rebuffed twice, but found that his empire did not have the resources to provide him with a sufficient navy at that time. With Mongol entry into the Korean court by marriage of the Korean crown prince to Kublai Khan's daughter, a mass construction of ships began on Korea's south-eastern shores, while the Mongols continued to demand Japan's surrender.
But I was surprised to learn it was Korea that encouraged the joint invasion of Japan by an allied force of Mongol and Korean troops.

Kublai Khan founded the Yuan dynasty in 1271. In 1272, King Chungnyeol offered counsel to Kublai Khan. According to Goryeosa, Japan is yet to know the world is hallowed. So dispatch emissaries and convey our military power to Japan. Battle ships and military rations are well prepared. If you appoint me, I encourage you to the extent of my power.[10] According to the History of Yuan, King of Goryeo ask Kublai Khan for conquering Japan. I am building 150 ships and encourage your conquest of Japan.[11]
15,000 Mongol and Chinese soldiers and 1,600–8,000 Korean soldiers composed first invasion, and 10,000 Korean soldiers, and 15,000 Mongols and Chinese composed second invasion (with a larger reinforcement from China whose size is disputed. )

If Goryeo actively egged on Mongols to invade Japan, and volunteered troops to the cause, then I assume the King expected some kind of benefit or compensation. What could it be? Is it possible Goryeo expected to share some of the territory if the invasion succeeded?
 
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Haakbus

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Aug 2013
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#2
Reading a bit on Mongol Invasion of Japan, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongol_invasions_of_Japan), I noticed something interesting.

The background is that Goryeo became a semi-autnonomous state of the Mongol Empire, and the Goryeo King gained certain privileges, like a a seat at the council, vote on the selection of Khans, and marrying the Mongol princess.



But I was surprised to learn it was Korea that encouraged the joint invasion of Japan by an allied force of Mongol and Korean troops.



15,000 Mongol and Chinese soldiers and 1,600–8,000 Korean soldiers composed first invasion, and 10,000 Korean soldiers, and 15,000 Mongols and Chinese composed second invasion (with a larger reinforcement from China whose size is disputed. )

If Goryeo actively egged on Mongols to invade Japan, and volunteered troops to the cause, then I assume the King expected some kind of benefit or compensation. What could it be?
Koryo was basically a protectorate of Yuan I guess you might say; the Mongols didn't care about the internal governance (AFAIK) but tightly controlled the king and court.

King Chungnyol encouraged the Mongols to invade Japan, probably to show his loyalty to the khan and distract the Mongols from Koryo.

The numbers are generally understood to have been very exaggerated, IIRC modern estimates put them at ~10,000 for the first invasion which was really reconnaissance-in-force and ~70,000 for the second invasion.

It's an interesting question.
 

Haakbus

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#3
I don't see Yuan allowing Koryo to have land in Japan, but what might Koryo do when the hypothetical Mongol protectorate of Japan began falling apart? Koryo might try to take over Tsushima at least.

This should be moved to Speculative.
 
#4
To my knowledge, Goryeo used the Mongols to receive free land from the Jurchens. Goryeo could have used the same tactic to get land from Japan. Or offer to manage Japan as a vassal while the great Khan does bigger things. Unlike other Mongol vassals, Korean troops were led by Korean generals
 
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Haakbus

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#5
To my knowledge, Goryeo used the Mongols to receive free land from the Jurchens. Goryeo could have used the same tactic to get land from Japan.
Interesting. Where can I read about that?

I do know that as Mongol control in Liaodong collapsed, Koryo took territory as far as Liaoyang and held it for about 18 years (1370-1388).
 

Haakbus

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#6
Also they either vassalized or conquered the Jurchens north of the Thousand Ri Wall in much of what is now Hamgyong and Ryanggang provinces in North Korea about this time. Is this what you were referring to?
 
#7
Ah, interesting. Upon further research, Goryeo apparently looked like this at one point when King Gongmin sent Lee Seonggye to taker Liaodong in 1370. But later, the Liaodong governor defected to the Ming.



Oh, and I was mistaken. Goryeo didn't get land from Mongols, that was from the Khaitens, when Seo Hee made a deal with the invading Khaitens that if they give Jurchen land to Goryeo, then Goryeo will be neutral in the Song-Khaiten war.
 

Haakbus

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Aug 2013
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#8
Ah, interesting. Upon further research, Goryeo apparently looked like this at one point when King Gongmin sent Lee Seonggye to taker Liaodong in 1370. But later, the Liaodong governor defected to the Ming.



Oh, and I was mistaken. Goryeo didn't get land from Mongols, that was from the Khaitens, when Seo Hee made a deal with the invading Khaitens that if they give Jurchen land to Goryeo, then Goryeo will be neutral in the Song-Khaiten war.
The link is broken sadly.

Yeah that was So Hui in ~993 who negotiated with the Liao to gain the territory all the way up to the Yalu river. In 1033-1044 the Thousand Ri Wall was constructed on the northeastern border from the Wonsan region northwest to the Yalu.
 
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#9
The Khitans attacked Goryeo, which was why Goryeo agreed to fight against them with the Mongols on Goryeo's side. After the Khitans were defeated, the Mongols invaded Goryeo. The Goryeo king survived the Mongol invasion by evacuating to an island called Ganghwa Island near the mainland of the Korean peninsula. Goryeo had a strong navy, and the island had plenty of mountain fortresses. Fighting continued on the mainland. Goryeo was exhausted from decades of fighting and sent Crown Prince Wonjong to the Yuan capital to swear allegiance. Kublai Khan accepted this and married one of his daughters to the crown prince. This was how the Goryeo dynasty was allowed to survive and gain special status as a surrendered faction. Some Goryeo officials refused to surrender and continued to resist from the southern Goryeo islands. I remember reading somewhere that Goryeo wanted to defeat the Japanese pirates called the wokou (or weh-goo in Korean) who ravaged the Korean coast.
 
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Haakbus

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Aug 2013
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#10
The Khitans attacked Goryeo, which was why Goryeo agreed to fight against them with the Mongols on Goryeo's side. After the Khitans were defeated, the Mongols invaded Goryeo. The Goryeo king survived the Mongol invasion by evacuating to an island called Ganghwa Island near the mainland of the Korean peninsula. Goryeo had a strong navy, and the island had plenty of mountain fortresses. Fighting continued on the mainland. Goryeo was exhausted from decades of fighting and sent Crown Prince Wonjong to the Yuan capital to swear allegiance. Kublai Khan accepted this and married one of his daughters to the crown prince. This was how the Goryeo dynasty was allowed to survive and gain special status as a surrendered faction. Some Goryeo officials refused to surrender and continued to resist from the southern Goryeo islands. I remember reading somewhere that Goryeo wanted to defeat the Japanese pirates called the wokou (or weh-goo in Korean) who ravaged the Korean coast.
Yeah the Japanese piracy raiding Korea basically had three episodes: during the early Shilla days in the fourth and fifth centuries, in the 13th century, and the main period beginning in the 1350s. The Mongols had forbidden them from making warships so it took some time until Koryo was able to form a navy to counter them around 1373.
 

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