Could Goryeo (Korea) have gained land through the Mongol Invasion of Japan?

Apr 2017
285
Northern lands
#21
The Ainu-Mongolic dichotomy is an arbitrary invention. The truth is, they are fairly close and are likely to have been part of the same migration group originally.
 
Sep 2016
446
天下
#22
^
Maybe you were too lazy to read.
No, I wasn't. Tell me please, where does it say that Korean tribes sprang up from Yayoi? Or that there was an idea of common descent with Japanese present among Goryeo elite? Or even that Korean is a Japonic language?

The Ainu-Mongolic dichotomy is an arbitrary invention. The truth is, they are fairly close and are likely to have been part of the same migration group originally.
And you don't pollute yet another thread.
 
Jun 2012
6,988
Malaysia
#23
Sep 2016
446
天下
#26
The most popular one is that they were the people who brought wet rice cultivation to Japan from the Korean peninsula and Jiangnan near the Yangtze River Delta in China.[1] This is supported by archeological researches and bones found in today southeastern China.

extracted from:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yayoi_people
That Japanese come from them? Sure, but what evidence there is of Koreans also coming from them? Linguisitic argument has to be unfortunately dropped because, as you know yourself, the relationship betwen Japanese and Korean remains unproven and contested by scholars.

I'm always right. You're always wrong.
No one even spoke about Ainu or Mongol relations with anyone. So, what was the point of your post if not spam?
 
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Jun 2012
6,988
Malaysia
#28
That Japanese come from them? Sure, but what evidence there is of Koreans also coming from them?
OMG. You make it sound so tough, man. Come on, dude. Yayoi people came to Japan from Korea. Their roots were in Korea, not Japan. So, logically, some of them wud hv stayed in Korea & begot offspring tribes in Korea. They cud not hv been like just a 50- or 100-man tribe who all left for Japan.
 
Sep 2016
446
天下
#29
OMG. You make it sound so tough, man. Come on, dude. Yayoi people came to Japan from Korea. Their roots were in Korea, not Japan. So, logically, some of them wud hv stayed in Korea & begot offspring tribes in Korea. They cud not hv been like just a 50- or 100-man tribe who all left for Japan.
Tough? Oh well, nevermind.

We can't really be speaking about "roots" when talking about ancient peoples. They probably migrated from somewhere else before coming to Korean Peninsula.

Proto-Japonic populations being partly assimilated into newcoming Koreanic population is a fact, so I don't dispute that. We have plenty of evidence in both Korean and Japanese chronicles of migrations and mingling of those two groups, which is confirmed by archeology.

However, this whole discussion started out with your conjure that some Goryeo elites could cherish an idea of "pan-Japonic" state, which is a completely baseless statement. Strong relationships between Japan and Korea ended with the fall of Baekje. Neither in Sillan nor Goryean literary works can we find any attempts to portray Japanese and Koreans as the same kin. To the contrary, the increasingly more significant Confucian way of thought would make Koreans look down on Japanese as barbarians.
 
Jun 2012
6,988
Malaysia
#30
I am just giving the possibilities. Like if I am some king contemplating the invasion & conquest of a neighbouring land, the idea of some past shared ancestry, whether proveable or otherwise, wud be one of my strategies for selling the invasion & conquest to the people whose land is being invaded & conquered. You hv to get some degree of buy in from them, to reduce their resistance to you. Otherwise, you'd be having to defeat & submit not just an army, but an entire nation behind that army.
 
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