Countries which could have had significantly more people right now

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,729
SoCal
#1
Which countries could have had significantly more people right now?

Off the top of my head, I can think of:

-Russia: Without Communism and World War II, Russia today would have a population of perhaps 500 million rather than slightly less than 150 million. Basically, Russia itself would probably have around two times more people and so would Ukraine and Belarus--thus resulting in a cumulative population of perhaps 400 million rather than 200 million. Add in Central Asia's population--which will be a bit larger in this TL due to no forced collectivization--as well as the population of the Caucasus and the Baltic countries, and you'd probably get around 500 million people.

-India: Without the loss of Pakistan and Bangladesh, India would have around 370 million more people (210 million for Pakistan and 160 million for Bangladesh). This would mean that India today would have around 1.70 billion people instead of 1.33 billion people.

-The Ottoman Empire/Turkey: Had it managed to keep its Arab provinces to the present-day, the Ottoman Empire/Turkey would have several dozen million additional people. Thus, it would have a population of perhaps 140-150 million people today instead of having 80 million people today.

-Germany would have had more people if it would have avoided World War II--perhaps 110 million people (which includes Austria) rather than 83 million people.

-Poland would have had more people if it wasn't for World War II and the Holocaust. I am not going to make a precise estimate for this since I don't know how many of Poland's Jews would have remained in Poland in the long(er)-run--especially after the U.S. eventually reopens its doors to large numbers of Jewish immigrants.

-Japan would have had more people if it wasn't for World War II, and so would China.

-China would have more people if it wasn't for World War II and especially for its one-child policy. Indeed, its one-child policy in itself caused China's current population to be 1.40 billion people rather than 1.60-1.80 billion people.

Anyway, what other countries can you think of for this?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,729
SoCal
#2
Also, before I forget--had it avoided World War I and survived to the present-day, Austria-Hungary might have had something like 80-100 million people rather than the less than 20 million people that Austria and Hungary currently cumulatively have.
 

pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,227
#5
Which countries could have had significantly more people right now?

Off the top of my head, I can think of:

-Russia: Without Communism and World War II, Russia today would have a population of perhaps 500 million rather than slightly less than 150 million. Basically, Russia itself would probably have around two times more people and so would Ukraine and Belarus--thus resulting in a cumulative population of perhaps 400 million rather than 200 million. Add in Central Asia's population--which will be a bit larger in this TL due to no forced collectivization--as well as the population of the Caucasus and the Baltic countries, and you'd probably get around 500 million people.

-India: Without the loss of Pakistan and Bangladesh, India would have around 370 million more people (210 million for Pakistan and 160 million for Bangladesh). This would mean that India today would have around 1.70 billion people instead of 1.33 billion people.

-The Ottoman Empire/Turkey: Had it managed to keep its Arab provinces to the present-day, the Ottoman Empire/Turkey would have several dozen million additional people. Thus, it would have a population of perhaps 140-150 million people today instead of having 80 million people today.

-Germany would have had more people if it would have avoided World War II--perhaps 110 million people (which includes Austria) rather than 83 million people.

-Poland would have had more people if it wasn't for World War II and the Holocaust. I am not going to make a precise estimate for this since I don't know how many of Poland's Jews would have remained in Poland in the long(er)-run--especially after the U.S. eventually reopens its doors to large numbers of Jewish immigrants.

-Japan would have had more people if it wasn't for World War II, and so would China.

-China would have more people if it wasn't for World War II and especially for its one-child policy. Indeed, its one-child policy in itself caused China's current population to be 1.40 billion people rather than 1.60-1.80 billion people.

Anyway, what other countries can you think of for this?
I don't think the assumptions underlying this math are reasonable.

Changing one thing changes others.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,729
SoCal
#6
I don't think the assumptions underlying this math are reasonable.

Changing one thing changes others.
Sure, but the big picture for various countries (Russia, India, Turkey, China) should not change too much.

Also, I think that it is perfectly plausible for Russia to keep all of its imperial territories other than Poland and perhaps Finland to the present-day as well as for India and Turkey to maintain their Muslim and non-Turkish territories, respectively, to the present-day.
 
Jul 2012
3,277
Dhaka
#9
central asia does not have a basis to support huge population due to the climate conditions.
What climate condition? Kazakhstan is one of the major wheat producers in the world.

mongols had been a past tense for a thousand years.
Yeah, and thus 100 thousand more people a thousand years ago would mean possibly 100 million more today.
 
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Shtajerc

Ad Honorem
Jul 2014
6,695
Lower Styria, Slovenia
#10
France. They were pretty much constantly at war since 1789 til 1815. Napoleon wasn't called a butcher for nothing. It's this period that caused France's population to stagnate or rise only slowly while the Germans outgrew them more and more.

Slovenia is another country that could have a much bigger population were it for a different cause of history. Slovene ancestors settled a territory much bigger than today's Slovenia - all of Carinthia, Styria, East Tyrol and parts of Upper and Lower Austria. These more northern lands were sparsely settled though so nobles brought in colonists from their posessions in Germany to increase the productivity and income of the land. This caused most of it to be germanised throughout the middle ages and early modern period. Then from the time of Maria Theresa onwards we talk about a planned germanisation that too had big effect. Slovene Lands also faced Ottoman raids and it is estimated that up to 1/3rd of Slovenes got killed or enslaved and taken away during that time. The second half of the 19th century brought agrarian overcrowding and this together with the blunder of many peasents after the abolishment of feudalism caused many to emigrate to mining/steel producing areas of Western Europe and especially America. The political situation after ww2 is pretty much the sole reason for the diaspora in Argentine and if we combine all this we can get anywhere from 4 to 6 million Slovenes instead of the current 2 million.