D Day - keeping it secret

GogLais

Ad Honorem
Sep 2013
5,222
Wirral
#1
There’s an article in my newspaper today about the wall map that was used to plan the landings. Chad Valley, a British toy maker, was commissioned to make a huge map covering all of Western Europe. A carpenter was then brought in to cut out the Normandy section and to fix it to the wall in Eisenhower’s HQ. He was then detained, I hope in some comfort, until September. An electrical engineer brought in to repair an electrical connection in the room was also detained. They thought of just about everything.
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,226
#2
I have more annoying security where I work..... Its no rocket science really..... about 60 seconds of talking to those in charge of security are sufficient to understand that they are not rocket scientists.... they just have natural acute paranoia and a total inability to listen to anyone or to understand rational arguments
 
Likes: Edratman
Mar 2019
885
Kansas
#3
There’s an article in my newspaper today about the wall map that was used to plan the landings. Chad Valley, a British toy maker, was commissioned to make a huge map covering all of Western Europe. A carpenter was then brought in to cut out the Normandy section and to fix it to the wall in Eisenhower’s HQ. He was then detained, I hope in some comfort, until September. An electrical engineer brought in to repair an electrical connection in the room was also detained. They thought of just about everything.
Regardless of the security, the level of planning that went into that invasion was astonishing. One of my favorite stories was crazy spitfire recon pilots flying along the beach at like 50 feet so they could photograph the terrain as it would have looked from landing craft, rather than using the tradition top down maps
 

Edratman

Ad Honorem
Feb 2009
6,570
Eastern PA
#4
Regardless of the security, the level of planning that went into that invasion was astonishing. One of my favorite stories was crazy spitfire recon pilots flying along the beach at like 50 feet so they could photograph the terrain as it would have looked from landing craft, rather than using the tradition top down maps
That is also proof of the overwhelming quantity of resources available to the allies in 1944.
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,818
Dispargum
#6
That is also proof of the overwhelming quantity of resources available to the allies in 1944.
Especially when you consider that to preserve secrecy they flew those low-level flights along the entire French coast and printed low-oblique photos of the entire French coast just so the Germans, the Spitfire pilots, the photo analysts, and everyone else would not be able to guess where the landings would go in.
 
Likes: Edratman

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,818
Dispargum
#8
There’s an article in my newspaper today about the wall map that was used to plan the landings. Chad Valley, a British toy maker, was commissioned to make a huge map covering all of Western Europe. A carpenter was then brought in to cut out the Normandy section and to fix it to the wall in Eisenhower’s HQ. He was then detained, I hope in some comfort, until September. An electrical engineer brought in to repair an electrical connection in the room was also detained. They thought of just about everything.
Those two detention stories sound a bit out there. Armies print maps by the thousands of copies. All of France had to be mapped at different scales to show different levels of detail. It would have been relatively simple for a few soldiers to come in hang up the appropriate map in Eisenhower's office. The soldiers would have the proper security clearances. They could even be officers if necessary. Similarly, the electrical work could have been done with the map behind a curtain. Eisenhower must have met with dozens, perhaps hundreds, of people every day - most of them not having the need to know where the landings would be. I can't imagine Eisenhower's map not having something as simple as a curtain.
 
Likes: Edratman

Edratman

Ad Honorem
Feb 2009
6,570
Eastern PA
#10
Especially when you consider that to preserve secrecy they flew those low-level flights along the entire French coast and printed low-oblique photos of the entire French coast just so the Germans, the Spitfire pilots, the photo analysts, and everyone else would not be able to guess where the landings would go in.
Every now and then I come across a story where someone has all but unlimited resources and I am envious.
 

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