D Day - keeping it secret

Oct 2015
232
Singapore
You're not comprehending what I wrote. As much as the battered Army Group B was starved of supplies at the time, and impressed by the Allies, the Allies were not doing so great either. Which was why the Germans largely escaped from the Falaise pocket. They didn't have the fuel, the artillery, or the supplies.
But the Allies had cakes and biscuits from home...
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,696
San Antonio, Tx
You are right, no one else was even close. We went to see the movie "Red Joan" two weeks ago, it was about a woman who worked for the British scientists working in England on a bomb. They were still doing theoretical calculations in 1945.
I wonder how close the Brits were because it was their Tubular Alloys project that kickstarted the whole thing, only they didn’t have the resources to take it further.
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,186
Sydney
an allied landing during the late spring wasn't a secret , it was obvious
the possible landings sites were along the channel coast and south of the mouth of the Rhine
with increasing probability for the coast from Cherbourg to Dunkirk
the quick possession of a port being seen as essential
accordingly the ports received the bulk of the defense ,
Rommel thought it was also vital to contest the landing on the beaches to keep any penetration shallow

once the troops were ashore ,anyone could see that 10 divisions were not a decoy ,
it was an army strength force and had to be dealt with
on the allied side things didn't work out much either
the airborne landing had a disruptive effect but a minor military result
none of the main objective was achieved ,
the most important securing Caen wasn't achieved , neither St Lo
Cherbourg was to be taken within days it held for 23days and the port installations were thoroughly wrecked
desperate rehabilitation work brought it back to operation by August
 

Edratman

Forum Staff
Feb 2009
6,708
Eastern PA
I wonder how close the Brits were because it was their Tubular Alloys project that kickstarted the whole thing, only they didn’t have the resources to take it further.
The British had not even started industrial level production of fissile material. That means they were not even in the ballpark.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,186
Sydney
the industrial production of enriched Uranium is an exceedingly costly endeavor

15,000 tons of silver -- 30 million pounds -- were withdrawn from federal vaults
formed into coils of wire. the coils were fashioned into magnets , send to Oak Ridge, Tennessee where they were used to enrich the U235
when the silver was returned to the federal treasury , only 0.04% were missing

In addition to the great effort required to ship and machine the silver, it took prodigious amounts of electricity to refine the uranium,
said Reed. "The electrical energy run through the magnet coils to separate U-235 for the Hiroshima bomb
was equivalent to about 1400 kilotons of TNT -- about 100 times the energy released by the bomb itself."

there was just enough material to make two Uranium bombs , three plutonium fatman were available
and two bomb a month could be produced
the Manhattan project was ruinously expensive
to this day there are strong doubts if the money and effort was well spend