Daily Dose of Archaeology 3.0

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Closed
Dec 2010
1,990
Oregon
From that link: 'The majority view in historical linguistics is that the homeland of Indo-European is located in the Pontic steppes (present day Ukraine) around 6,000 years ago. The evidence for this comes from linguistic paleontology: in particular, certain words to do with the technology of wheeled vehicles are arguably present across all the branches of the Indo-European family; and archaeology tells us that wheeled vehicles arose no earlier than this date. The minority view links the origins of Indo-European with the spread of farming from Anatolia 8,000 to 9,500 years ago.'

Regarding origins, the majority and leading minority view bracket the Black Sea. Their estimated timelines - 4000 BC vs ~6750 BC - bracket a purported Black Sea megaflood event (~5600 BC).

I wonder if there's a serious movement among researchers to explore possible links?
 
May 2011
832
Bulgaria
From that link: 'The majority view in historical linguistics is that the homeland of Indo-European is located in the Pontic steppes (present day Ukraine) around 6,000 years ago. The evidence for this comes from linguistic paleontology: in particular, certain words to do with the technology of wheeled vehicles are arguably present across all the branches of the Indo-European family; and archaeology tells us that wheeled vehicles arose no earlier than this date. The minority view links the origins of Indo-European with the spread of farming from Anatolia 8,000 to 9,500 years ago.'

Regarding origins, the majority and leading minority view bracket the Black Sea. Their estimated timelines - 4000 BC vs ~6750 BC - bracket a purported Black Sea megaflood event (~5600 BC).

I wonder if there's a serious movement among researchers to explore possible links?
I've read an article, speculating the same idea.
Made a thread about it some time ago:
http://www.historum.com/ancient-history/29756-great-flood.html
 
Dec 2010
1,990
Oregon
Chinese archaeologists' African quest for sunken ship of Ming admiral

'A team of 11 Chinese archaeologists will arrive in Kenya tomorrow to begin the search for an ancient shipwreck and other evidence of commerce with China dating back to the early 15th century. The three-year, £2m joint project will centre around the tourist towns of Lamu and Malindi and should shed light on a largely unknown part of both countries' histories.

The sunken ship is believed to have been part of a mighty armada commanded by Ming dynasty admiral Zheng He, who reached Malindi in 1418. According to Kenyan lore, reportedly backed by recent DNA testing, a handful of survivors swum ashore. After killing a python that had been plaguing a village, they were allowed to stay and marry local women, creating a community of African-Chinese whose descendants still live in the area.

A likely shipwreck site has been identified near Lamu island, according to Idle Farah, director general of the National Museums of Kenya, which is working on the archaeology project with its Chinese equivalent and Peking University.'

 
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