Daily Dose of Archaeology 4.0

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Lowell2

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Jun 2014
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Excavation at Oregon site unearths ancient stone tool | Fox News Archaeologists unearthed a stone tool at an ancient rock shelter in Oregon that could be older than any known site of human occupation in western North America.

The hand-held scraper was chipped from a piece of orange agate that is not normally found in eastern Oregon. The tool was found about eight niches below a layer of volcanic ash from an eruption of Mount St. Helen’s dated from about 15,000 years ago. The depth was about 12 feet below the surface.
The U.S. Bureau of Land Management announced the find Thursday. An archaeologist from the agency, Scott Thomas, said that if the age of the site holds up to scrutiny, it would be the oldest west of the Rockies, predating the Clovis culture that is believed to be the first people to migrate from Asia to North America about 13,000 years ago.
 
Sep 2012
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London, centre of my world
well, since it was the tomb of a guard, he probably hired the equivalent of "my sister's husband's brother":zany: to do the painting rather than the artisans hired by the pharaoh. Still, while not the best possible Egyptian art, it remains vibrant and eloquent.
I wonder what the ancient Egyptian was for: 'some bloke I know down the pub'?
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
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The Archaeology News Network: Ancient shipwrecks discovered in Jeddah Saudi and German archaeologists have discovered two ancient shipwrecks along the Jeddah coast, in a joint project between the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA) and the Philipps University of Marburg in Germany. The Roman ship discovered is the oldest archaeologically documented shipwreck found along the Saudi Arabian coast, she said. The other ship dates to the early Islamic era. There was also an ancient jetty found, she said.
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
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The Archaeology News Network: Karnak excavation yields 38 artefacts The Centre franco-égyptien d'étude des temples de Karnak (CNRS/Egyptian Ministry of State for Antiquities) has just completed the excavation of a favissa, a pit discovered in early December 2014 near the temple of the god Ptah. The dig has unearthed 38 statues, statuettes and precious objects, making this an exceptional find, both for the quantity and quality of the religious artifacts brought to light.

Built during the reign of Thutmose III (c.1479 -- c.1424 BC), the temple of Ptah was restored, enlarged and adapted throughout the period before the reign of Emperor Tiberius (14-37 AD).
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
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Queen Sobekneferu This Queen's name is sometimes written as Nefrusobek. She was a Queen-Pharoah and the 8th ruler of the 12th Dynasty. Probably the daughter of Amenemhet III and the half sister of Amenemhet IV.


Sobekneferu ruled at the end of the Twelfth Dynasty. Some have suggested that she ruled alongside Amenemhat III and/or Amenemhat IV. According to Egyptian tradition, she ruled independently. The Turin Canon gives almost 4 years of rule, as does Manetho.


More specifically, the Turin Kinglist states
"The King of Upper and Lower Egypt [Sobek]-nef[ru]-re, 3 years, 10 months and 24 days" The Ancient Egypt Site

Statues from Tell el-Daba and the Fayoum as well as an architrave from Herakleopolis have been found. Inscription on the nilometer at Nubian Semna records 3 years of her rule. An inscription from Hawara shows her name (see below).


She is thought to have built a pyramid at Mazghuna. The structure was apparently not been completed, and probably never used. Only its underground part was finished.
 

athena

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Jan 2010
5,032
Eugene, Oregon
Excavation at Oregon site unearths ancient stone tool | Fox News Archaeologists unearthed a stone tool at an ancient rock shelter in Oregon that could be older than any known site of human occupation in western North America.

The hand-held scraper was chipped from a piece of orange agate that is not normally found in eastern Oregon. The tool was found about eight niches below a layer of volcanic ash from an eruption of Mount St. Helen’s dated from about 15,000 years ago. The depth was about 12 feet below the surface.
The U.S. Bureau of Land Management announced the find Thursday. An archaeologist from the agency, Scott Thomas, said that if the age of the site holds up to scrutiny, it would be the oldest west of the Rockies, predating the Clovis culture that is believed to be the first people to migrate from Asia to North America about 13,000 years ago.

Here is a little bit more about this find.

http://www.opb.org/news/article/oregon-archaeologists-discover-15000-year-old-knife/
Evidently blood was found on the scraper and it test to be in the line of buffalo's, and camel teeth were found, and-

Another site in Oregon, Paisley Cave, is considered home to the earliest known residents of North America based on human physical evidence. In 2008, a team of archaeologists, led by Dr. Dennis Jenkins, discovered coprolites - fossilized feces - containing human DNA dated over 14,000 years old.
 
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Lowell2

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Jun 2014
6,541
California
The Archaeology News Network: IS militants destroy ancient Hatra in northern Iraq Islamic State (IS) militants have destroyed ancient remains of the 2,000-year-old city of Hatra in northern Iraq, the tourism and antiquities ministry says.

An official said the ministry had received reports from its employees in the northern city of Mosul, which is under the control of the radical Islamist group, that the site at Hatra had been demolished on Saturday.

It was difficult to confirm the reports and the ministry had not received any pictures showing the extent of the damage, the official said.

But a resident in the area said he heard a powerful explosion early on Saturday and said other people nearby had reported that IS militants had destroyed some of the larger buildings in Hatra and were bulldozing other parts.
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
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Did Neandertals make jewelry 130,000 years go? Eagle claws provide clues -- ScienceDaily rapina Neandertals may have manipulated white-tailed eagle talons to make jewelry 130,000 years ago, before the appearance of modern human in Europe, according to a study published March 11, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Frayer from University of Kansas and colleagues from Croatia. Researchers describe eight mostly complete white-tailed eagle talons from the Krapina Neandertal site in present-day Croatia, dating to approximately 130,000 years ago.

see also Davorka Radovčić, Ankica Oros Sršen, Jakov Radovčić, David W. Frayer. Evidence for Neandertal Jewelry: Modified White-Tailed Eagle Claws at Krapina. PLOS ONE, 2015; 10 (3): e0119802 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0119802

 
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