Daily Dose of Archaeology 4.0

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Lowell2

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Jun 2014
6,541
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Joseph Kardon - Denarius of Julius Caesar Research Commentary


The silver denarius (3.9 g) minted by Julius Caesar in 49 BCE was his first coin issue in the civil war that resulted in Caesar’s sole rule over the Roman state. These types offer insight into the ideological transition from the Republic to the Empire.

The coin’s reverse face (featuring the elephant) is the subject of interpretive disagreement. A close examination of the iconographic tradition on Roman coins supports an interpretation of the type as an advertisement of Caesar’s conquest of Gaul. The reverse helped establish the precedent for future emperors to secure their army’s loyalty through conquest.



The elephant is an allusion to one of the possible meanings for Caesar ( Julius Caesar himself propagated the derivation from the elephant, an animal that was said to have been called caesai in the "Moorish", i.e. probably Punic language,[25] thereby following the claims of his family that they inherited the cognomen from an ancestor, who had received the name after killing an elephant, possibly during the first Punic War)
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
6,541
California
Scientists: Cervantes' Lost Remains Are Found
NEWSER) – The lost remains of Don Quixote author Miguel de Cervantes may have finally been found nearly 400 years after the writer's death—and a year after experts began searching for them. Experts working at Madrid's Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians used ground-penetrating radar among other technology to identify what the BBC terms a "forgotten crypt" beneath the convent. There, in one of its 33 alcoves, they believe they have uncovered the bones of the "Prince of Letters," as well as those of his wife and others buried alongside him. Though forensic scientist Almudena Garcia Rubio concedes "the remains are in a bad state of conservation and do not allow us to do an individual identification of Miguel de Cervantes ... we are sure what the historical sources say is the burial of Miguel de Cervantes ... is what we have found."
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
6,541
California
The Archaeology News Network: Early Roman fortifications discovered in Trieste
The area known as San Rocco in Muggia (a commune of Trieste province) could hold secrets to the origins of Trieste (or Tergeste, as it was known in ancient times). An interdisciplinary team—led by ICTP reseachers Federico Bernardini and Claudio Tuniz—has discovered an archaeological site with Roman military fortification systems, composed of a big central camp flanked by two minor forts. The team believes that this site, which dates back to the first decades of the 2nd century BC, is most likely to be where the Romans laid the first foundations of Trieste.
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
6,541
California
The Archaeology News Network: Creating a malaria test for ancient human remains

A Yale University scientist has developed a promising new method to identify malaria in the bone marrow of ancient human remains. It is the first time researchers have been able to establish a diagnostic, human skeletal profile for the disease, which is transmitted by mosquitoes and continues to infect millions of people a year. The new process may allow scientists to track the spread of malaria back to its first appearance in human populations. The method, which works effectively on bones resistant to previous forms of testing, also may be applicable to other diseases.
 
Feb 2013
4,243
Coastal Florida
Forensic Analysis Reveals Pharaoh Was Killed In Battle



In collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities, The University of Pennsylvania team discovered new evidence on the life and death of pharaoh Senebkay who founded the 16th Dynasty of the Second Intermediate Period.

The pharaoh's skeleton forensic analysis performed by researchers directed by Dr. Josef Wegne indicated that the reason behind the death of this king was due to a number of wounds received during a fierce battle from multiple assailants or an ambush.

The skeleton was found by Pennsylvania mission last year inside the King's tomb in Abydos, Suhag Governoratem said Dr. Eldamaty, Minister of Antiquities.

The analysis shows that the king received eighteen wounds reaching his bones including major cuts to his feet, ankles and lower back. There are also a number of blows at the skull which give us some ideas about the shape and type of battle axes and weapons used during that time.

Also the angle and direction of the King's wounds imply that he was in an elevated position (may be on horseback or on a chariot) relative to his attackers. The assailants probably wounded his lower part first (feet, ankles and lower back) in order to drag him on the floor then finished him with axe blows to the skull.

Moreover, analysis by Dr. Maria Rosado and Dr. Jane Hill of Rowan University, New Jersey, shows that the King died at an earlier age, 35-40 years, than initially thought. It also indicated that the king was a horse rider through the shape of his pelvis and leg bones, a matter suggesting that horseback riding may have played a growing role in military activities during that time.In collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities, The University of Pennsylvania team discovered new evidence on the life and death of pharaoh Senebkay who founded the 16th Dynasty of the Second Intermediate Period.
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
6,541
California
Prehistoric stone tools bear 500,000-year-old animal residue -- ScienceDaily
Among 500,000-year-old elephant remains at a Lower Paleolithic site in Revadim, Israel, archaeologists recently analyzed 'hand axes' and 'scrapers,' universally shaped and sized prehistoric stone tools, replete with animal residue. The research represents the first scientifically verified direct evidence for the precise use of Paleolithic stone tools: to process animal carcasses and hides.
 

Lowell2

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Jun 2014
6,541
California
Human parasites found in medieval cesspit reveal links between Middle East and Europe -- ScienceDaily Analysis of a latrine in Jerusalem that dates back over 500 years finds human parasites common in northern Europe yet very rare in Middle East at the time, suggesting long-distance trade or pilgrimage routes and shedding light on prevalent infectious diseases of the age. The fish tapeworm was prevalent in northern Europe due to the popularity of fish as a food and the nature of its preparation: often eaten raw, smoked or pickled -- which doesn't kill the parasite. According to Arabic texts of the time, in inland Syrian cities such as Jerusalem fish was not commonly eaten, and when consumed was always cooked thoroughly in accordance with local culinary traditions. This cooking kills the parasite and prevents its spread.
The team also found pieces of Italian pottery in the same cesspit, reinforcing the hypothesis of strong trading or religious links between Europe and Jerusalem during the late 1400s.
 
Dec 2010
1,990
Oregon
Qin dynasty crossbow found at China’s Terracota Army site may reveal secret of emperor’s success

A 2,200-year old 1.3-metre long crossbow believed to have had a range of up to 800 metres has been found by archaeologists during excavations in China.

The crossbow is referred to in many ancient historic documents, which stated that the victories of Qin’s army owed much to its use of bows, which could fire arrows over long distances and cause large numbers of casualties among its enemies.
 

Moros

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Jun 2012
3,070
The team also found pieces of Italian pottery in the same cesspit, reinforcing the hypothesis of strong trading or religious links between Europe and Jerusalem during the late 1400s.
This makes it sound like they've discovered something startling. Trade and religious links with Jerusalem during the 15th Century is well known.
 
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