Daily Dose of Archaeology 4.0

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okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
CELTIC BRONZE BRACELET UNEARTHED IN POLAND
Valuable archaeological discovery near Sanok | News | Science & Scholarship in Poland

Bronze bracelet from the 3rd century BC has been discovered in Pakoszówka near Sanok (Subcarpathian province). This ornament is one of the most valuable objects associated with the Celts discovered in the region - told PAP Piotr Kotowicz, an archaeologist with the Historical Museum in Sanok.
Scientists were informed of the discovery by the finder. Only fragments of the bracelet were preserved. According to the archaeologist, it is hard to determine the circumstances in which the ornament ended up in the ground. The fact that it was discovered in the fragmented form drew the attention of scientists - it could be deliberately destroyed.

Archaeologists know from previous studies that ancient Celtic settlement had existed near the village Pakoszówka. There are other monuments of this period in the collections of the Historical Museum in Sanok - mainly fragments of pottery, a fragment of glass bracelet and a gold coin. "Maybe the owner of the bracelet lived in the village, the traces of which have been recorded in the same place" - believes Kotowicz.
 

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
Anthropologist offers possible explanation for collapse of ancient city of Teotihuacan
Anthropologist offers possible explanation for collapse of ancient city of Teotihuacan
Linda Manzanilla, an anthropologist with Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México has published a paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offering a possible explanation for the collapse of the early central Mexican city of Teotihuacan—she believes it was due to clashes between groups with differing economic interests.

The ruins of Teotihuacan can be seen today at a location approximately 30 miles northeast of modern Mexico City, and offer testament to the flourishing metropolis that once was home to approximately 125,000 people, making it the most populous city in the pre-Columbia Americas. The city got its start around 100 BCE, but was completely decimated by the eighth century. Why it collapsed has been a subject of debate among historians and anthropologists for several years. In this new effort, Manzanilla suggests it was not drought or invaders that brought down the great city, but internal strife among its inhabitants.
 

okamido

Forum Staff
Jun 2009
29,885
land of Califia
Archaeologists Find Byzantine Coins, Roman Inscription in Aquae Calidae ? Thermopolis Preserve in Bulgaria?s Burgas | Archaeology in Bulgaria
A new batch of various ancient and medieval artifacts has been discovered during the excavations of the Aquae Calidae – Thermopolis Archaeological Preserve in the Bulgarian Black Sea city of Burgas, the Burgas Municipality has announced.

The latest finds from the Ancient Thracian and Roman city of Aquae Calidae – known as Therma or Thermopolis in the Middle Ages – which was famous for its mineral springs, include a large number of Byzantine coins, a fragment of an Ancient Roman inscription on a marble slab, an ancient marble statuette as well as part of the city fortress wall.

The Aquae Calidae – Thermopolis Archaeological Preserve is currently being excavated in rescue digs funded by the Burgas Municipality not only as part of its plans to turn the site into a major tourist attraction, but also because of the ongoing rehabilitation of the water supply and sewerage system in Banevo and Vetren, the two Burgas quarters located on top of the ancient and medieval city. The archaeologists are exploring the strata at a depth of 3 meters.

A total of 80 artifacts from different time periods have been found, including 45 coins. Some of the Byzantine coins are “cup-shaped”, the so called scyphates, dating back to the end of the 12th and the beginning of the 13th century. They were minted by the Byzantine Emperors from the Komnenos Dynasty (1081-1185 AD) and the Angelos Dynasty (1185-1204 AD).
 

Lowell2

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,541
California
From Stone Darts to Dismembered Bodies, New Study Reveals 5,000 Years of Violence in Central California | Western Digs
From Stone Darts to Dismembered Bodies, New Study Reveals 5,000 Years of Violence in Central California, In an effort to understand life and death in one of the ancient West’s most populous regions, anthropologists conducted a landmark study of its dead, cataloging signs of violence found in burials between the Sierra Nevada and the San Francisco Bay, dating from historic times all the way back to 3000 BCE. Chronicling 16,820 burials from 329 sites among 13 different ethnographic groups, the data reveal that the most common type of violence over the millennia was so-called sharp-force trauma, caused by projectiles like arrows or atlatl darts, which appeared in 7.2% of the burials studied.

Another 4.3% of the hunter-gatherers suffered apparent blunt-force trauma to the head, while just under 1% showed evidence of dismemberment, with limbs, scalps, or heads having been removed after death.
 
Jun 2012
2,939
Brazil
One thousand years of spirituality, innovation, and social development emerge from a ceremonial center on the Scottish archipelago of Orkney

Spanning a millennium of activity beginning around 5,000 years ago, these exquisitely preserved buildings, including foundations and low walls, are revealing how Neolithic society changed over time, and why Orkney—despite its seemingly remote location—was at the center of Neolithic Europe. “Thank goodness the Taits didn’t use a deep plow, or else we’d have been looking at a pile of rubble,” says Towers.



Instead of digging up a Bronze Age coffin in the 2003 test trench, as they expected, the archaeologists uncovered part of a finely crafted Neolithic wall. “It had sharp internal angles, beautifully coursed stonework, and fine corner buttresses,” explains Nick Card of the Orkney Research Centre for Archaeology, dig director at the site, now known as the “Ness of Brodgar.”



The next year the archaeologists embarked on a season of digging test pits and trial trenches across the field. To their delight they encountered incredible Neolithic stonework in virtually every hole. Realizing that they were looking at a major Neolithic complex,
Neolithic Europe's Remote Heart - Archaeology Magazine
 

Lowell2

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,541
California
Western Washington?s ?Completely New? Projectile Points - Archaeology Magazine
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON—A tool-making site estimated to be more than 10,000 years old has been found along Bear Creek in suburban Seattle. Thousands of stone flakes and bifaces, scrapers, and hammerstones were recovered, along with two projectile-point fragments that are concave-based, “something not seen at any time in the local projectile point sequence,” Robert Kopperl of SWCA Environmental Consultants told Western Digs. The artifacts were found under a layer of peat radiocarbon dated to about 10,000 years ago. Burned bits of willow, poplar, and pine dated to between 10,000 and 12,500 years ago were found in the layer with the artifacts. “It’s the oldest artifact assemblage from western Washington, and the excellent context in which we were able to do our excavations and sampling is now providing a picture, much clearer than ever before, of the environment these people were living in during the transition out of the Ice Age,” Kopperl explained. To read in-depth about the first people to reach the New World, see "America, in the Beginning."
 

Lowell2

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,541
California
Poisons, plants and Palaeolithic hunters
Dozens of common plants are toxic. Archaeologists have long suspected that our Palaeolithic ancestors used plant poisons to make their hunting weapons more lethal. Now Dr Valentina Borgia has teamed up with a forensic chemist to develop a technique for detecting residues of deadly substances on archaeological objects.
Until very recently it has been impossible to prove that poisons extracted from plants were used by early societies. Now Dr Valentina Borgia, a specialist in Palaeolithic hunting weapons and Marie Curie Fellow at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, believes that she is on the brink of being able to prove that our ancestors used poisons as far back as 30,000 years ago.

Read more at: Poisons, plants and Palaeolithic hunters

Foxglove:


monkshood:
 

Lowell2

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,541
California
'Nazi Lair' Found Deep in Jungle (NEWSER) – As the Nazis began to suffer battlefield reverses in World War II, they secretly began building a network of hideouts so remote that one of them has only just been discovered, according to archaeologists in Argentina. A University of Buenos Aires team says it believes three ruined stone buildings in a jungle area near the border with Paraguay formed a lair that Nazi leaders planned to escape to in the event of defeat, the Telegraph reports. They say that after months of exploring the site, which they had to cut their way to with machetes, they've found items including Nazi-era German coins, "Made in Germany" porcelain, and Nazi symbols on the walls.

The site, in a location that would make it easy to slip across the border from Argentina to Paraguay, "is a defensible site, a protected site, an inaccessible place, a place to live in peace, a place of refuge," the lead researcher tells Argentina's Clarin newspaper. "And I think what we find is a place of refuge for the Nazi hierarchy.
 
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