Dare we speak about "Brexit?"

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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
2,829
Sydney
On the EU "hard" negotiating position , I'm not sure that is the case
The EU negotiators have 27 various members with a tendency to scatter on issues
keeping them in line means sticking to simple principles , it's a necessity
further the EU has various agreements with other European countries , some quite onerous ,
cutting a soft deal would undermine their value .
 

GogLais

Ad Honorem
Sep 2013
4,725
Wirral
[
On the EU "hard" negotiating position , I'm not sure that is the case
The EU negotiators have 27 various members with a tendency to scatter on issues
keeping them in line means sticking to simple principles , it's a necessity
further the EU has various agreements with other European countries , some quite onerous ,
cutting a soft deal would undermine their value .
That’s understandable, the EU is free to take whatever negotiating position it likes. Funny really, some Brexiteers spent years telling us how badly the EU treated the UK but getting a deal would be easy because Germany would be desperate to carry on selling cars to us.
 
Aug 2010
14,632
Wessex
I have to get out of this one!
I reckon "Goodness me, can that really be true? " could be humorous or sarcastic, in speech the tone of voice would tell you, but written?
It is I who should apologize for making a facetious (and I fear, altogether unfunny) remark; I promise to restrain myself in future!
 
Jan 2016
1,037
Collapsed wave
Also it's a bit of a zero sum game. Britain's loss of business is EU' win when companies start to relocate their stuff to the continent.
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
4,565
Also it's a bit of a zero sum game. Britain's loss of business is EU' win when companies start to relocate their stuff to the continent.
That's rather theoretical. In reality we might rather be looking at business just being reduced and so more of a lose-lose draw-down and loss of real economy.

The French might be harbouring some hopes in that regard, but it's not much of a motive behind the EU's stance. That is rather to safe-guard and not risk compromising the Common Market, which is rather more important for a win-win than the UK future trade.
 

Vaeltaja

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
3,585
The EU should be representing the interests of their citizens; representing the collective business of the people of the member states.
They also ought to represent (to paraphrase Brexiteers) the 'will of the people' - and that ain't favorable for the UK in the EU at the moment as shown in the polls you can find from the link i posted. After all the EU represents the member states - and the EU council represents the standing governments of the member states all which kind of want to remain in the good graces of their respective constituents.

Additionally it has been made apparent that allowing the UK to have partial access (akin to Chequers) could easily end up costing whole lot more to the EU than what even a clean 'no-deal' might do. If that is truthful is debatable as there are at least as many opinions of the economic outcome of such matters as there are economists but it nonetheless underlines the point that the EU with its tough line is - or might well be (depending on opinion) - safeguarding and representing the interests of EU citizens. That however is not a denial from the fact that the Brexit will hurt the EU - just that going along with partial access stuff might easily cost more to the EU in the long term. And given the estimates of the costs for the EU for that in the long term the famous £39B is just pocket change. Again, it is next to impossible to predict if that is true or not.
 
May 2016
253
Greater Manchester
Also it's a bit of a zero sum game. Britain's loss of business is EU' win when companies start to relocate their stuff to the continent.
Companies relocating from mighty London and all the benefits that being there brings to relocate to some minor city like Paris, Berlin or Frankfurt? In your dreams.

I seem to remember the similar scaremongering from the Europhiles when we were debating whether or not to adopt the euro, with Europhiles saying that failing to adopt the euro would see Paris and Frankfurt overtaking London as financial powerhouses. Instead Britain didn't adopt the euro and London just pulled further ahead of Paris and Frankfurt.

So all this talk of companies relocating out of Britain just because Britain has decided to regain its independence and no longer be ruled by a bunch of gangsters from insignificant countries is just a load of tosh.
 
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