Dark Emu II: Precolonial Australian societies tilled the land

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,593
Australia
Why is the history of Australia being discussed in an Asian thread

:think:

Maybe because this isnt an 'Asian thread' its a thread about :

' Dark Emu II: Precolonial Australian societies tilled the land '

what made you think it was about Asia ? Did you actually READ any of it ?


Unless you have thread and forum mixed up together . This is a thread .

message thread Definition from PC Magazine Encyclopedia

Whereas the 'forum' is an Asian history forum .

And all the forums together here is an Internet site ...... called ' Historum'





1562535004690.png
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,593
Australia
http://www.rusanjo.com/wanda2.png
A European settler Thomas Holt began grazing sheep and cattle on the dunes. He removed trees and shrubs, exposing the sand.

Sad, but it is happening all around. Himalayas are being destroyed by road building because the villagers want that. Touch it and it is gone.

Thats some landslide !

A road near where I used to live and liked riding my motorcycle kept getting covered by land slide . If not you would have to swerve around boulders that had just landed on it . Right next to the coast with no where else to re-route it ..... so ; ' Sea Cliff Bridge '



1562535595333.png
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,896
New Delhi, India
' Sea Cliff Bridge '
That sure is a good idea, but not possible in Himalayas. Himalayas are 'touch me nots'. The pillars also will have an unstable base. Though I do not have any knowledge about building roads in such conditions, I think the area has to be stabilized over decades by slowly widening foot paths into roads.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,593
Australia
Why are you linking to another forum and site for a subject already being discussed here ?

Even so the first part states ; " From what I've gathered at a glance " .... really ? This is history ?

Even after a very short read , it quotes Gammage ;

" Gammage suggests that not only did Indigenous Australians discover a form of agriculture, they developed an agricultural technology that Europeans didn't even realise was possible. "
 

Kookaburra Jack

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,966
Rural Australia
Even after a very short read , it quotes Gammage ;

" Gammage suggests that not only did Indigenous Australians discover a form of agriculture, they developed an agricultural technology that Europeans didn't even realise was possible. "

Another response there quotes from Dark Emu as follows:


The great advantage of Aboriginal crops is that they have been developed through seed selection, direct planting and weeding for the harsh conditions of Australia. Many of the grains grow on sand and require a minimum of irrigation. The good news is that the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation has been studying some of these grains with a view to incorporating them in the modern agriculture of Australia.

Latz says that, ‘the nutritional value of the seeds from the desert species is equal to or better than that of the cultivated grains’.95 These indigenous plants promise a huge economic bounty for the country and our future prosperity demands they be given serious consideration.

Many early observers commented on the aesthetic proportions, tasteful positioning and social harmony of the townships. Sturt described one town as evening fell:

the natives … sat up to a late hour at their own camp, the women being employed beating the seed for cakes, between two stones, and the noise they made was exactly like the working of a loom factory. The whole encampment, with the long line of fires, looked exceedingly pretty, and the dusky figures of the natives standing by them, or moving from one hut to the other, had the effect of a fine scene in a play. At eleven all was still, and you would not have known that you were in such close contiguity to so large an assemblage of people.137
The smaller huts attached to the dwellings of this and other clans were full of stored produce. Yards attached to these store houses were used as animal holding pens. People here were not clinging on to survival in the desert; they were thriving and engaged in a rich and joyful life.

Pottery is one of the tests applied by Western archaeologists to the developmental level reached by civilisations. Australian Aboriginals would, at first glance, appear to have failed this test. The superb glazed and kiln-fired pottery of China, Greece or Rome has not been found here; however, clay vessels were made. While most were relatively crude sun-dried bowls, some were baked beside the fire; others, particularly small clay figurines, were fired on charcoal beds and some were glazed with mineral washes.

The tests applied in this way simply test how similar a group is to European and Asian civilisations and may not reflect their success in other areas such as social cohesion, resistance to warfare or sustainable use of resources. This chapter looks at elements of Australian pottery and food preservation because the perceived lack of them in Australia has been used as an indicator of social backwardness. This attitude prejudices opinion about the level of development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. To point out that Indigenous Australia did indeed use baked clay vessels and preserved food is not an attempt to claim distinction for the First Australians, but simply to point out that if that were the only test for development it cannot be seen as completely absent from this country.

According to the earliest records, the use of clay to render houses or make storage vessels was witnessed in most parts of Australia although the crude drying and firing methods may have resulted in the remaining fragments being overlooked by later surveys. Stores of food were seen across the continent too; although most disappeared quickly, some ossified caches have been found in stone chambers, preserved by the tight fitting stone plugs.

Gerritsen suggests the storage of food surpluses is one of the indicators of agricultural nations and defines three types of food storage used in Australia: ‘caching, stockpiling and … direct storage’.
–– Bruce Pascoe: "Dark emu: black seeds agriculture or accident?", Magabala Books: Broome, 2014.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Aupmanyav

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,896
New Delhi, India
Specul8, my like is not for that particular post but for many on this topic and so too the one to Kookaburra Jack. I respect the natives of any place, they lived their lives in the way they liked and according to their environment. No two cultures should be compared to each other.
 

MG1962a

Ad Honorem
Mar 2019
2,353
Kansas
Specul8, my like is not for that particular post but for many on this topic and so too the one to Kookaburra Jack. I respect the natives of any place, they lived their lives in the way they liked and according to their environment. No two cultures should be compared to each other.
In general Kookaburra is in agreement. Many of these posts are in response to people keen to denigrate Aboriginal culture because in their eyes it is not as good as European.