Dark Emu II: Precolonial Australian societies tilled the land

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,290
Australia
#45
Old stories die hard. That is what I say in IE migration threads also. Somewhere or the other they find mention.
Yes, I was thinking that others with a strong oral tradition (like the source of the Vedas ) might find some of this research and findings interesting.

I experimented with it a bit myself, having to learn long complex parts of dialogue and actions for ceremonies - I abhor working off a script !

I could not get it until I started learning my lines on long walks and associating what I was learning with visual keys .

The Memory Code by Lynne Kelly outlines the process very well ( although her conclusions about linking world wide megalithic sites in the same way seems suspect ) .

" In the past, the elders had encyclopaedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across the landscape, and the stars in the sky too. Yet most of us struggle to memorise more than a short poem.

" Mobile cultures use significant landscape places in order to keep a record of each aspect of the knowledge. They encode it in the landscape. If a society is to settle they must replicate these set of locations in the local area. That is the very basis of the monuments. But there’s a lot more to it than that!


4. Signs of a prescribed order—the Method of Loci


If a monument is a memory space, then there must be a prescribed order to the memory locations so that information is not lost through lack of reference. The ancient Greeks described their locations from their preliterate times: there should be a defined sequence in a location away from distracting passers-by which is well lit, with loci not too much like one another, of moderate size, with a moderate distance between them. My research shows that all oral cultures did this – and we have ample evidence from Australia of a continuous knowledge culture for tens of thousands of years. '


With the Aboriginals having no megalithic structures, they used features in the landscape to stimulate memory .

This process is also projected into the celestial realm ;

" 7. Astronomical observations and calendrical devices


Whoever maintains the calendar holds a very powerful role in oral cultures. Detailed astronomical observances were common among complex hunter-gatherers, primarily to maintain calendars and schedule ceremonies. The heavens were also used as memory aids, with characters and stories attributed to stars and planets as it is the case with every society, literate or non-literate. "

We see this link in many stories, they often do not have a 'normal' conclusion but 'hang in stasis' - events are transformed into the sky and - 'freeze frame' - they stay like that , as a reminder .

[ Eg . A boy and girl are chased by two guardians, they run to the edge of the world and up into the sky. The guardians follow. They run across the sky and the guardians throw a trowing stick and boomerang at them . There the story 'stops' and the stars in what we call Scorpius are pointed out ; " There's the girl and the boy at the front , there is the stick and boomerang and there at the end are the guardians chasing them." Of course the story does not end there, it continues, in moral, in the lives and acts of the people. One thing interesting about this story is it seems to encapsualte all the averse and even perverse qualities of human nature that western astrology associates with Scorpio . Its a rather shcking and confronting story, even to modern people .... it is a very shocking story to the indigenous ! ]

and of course rock art

" 10. Rock art as mnemonic


We know from historic oral cultures that rock art is often used to aid memory of the stories, songs, chants and other aspects of the knowledge system. Abstract art is far more useful as multiple layers of information can be encoded and secrecy maintained. "


Monuments for memory – the Ten Indicators
 
Likes: Aupmanyav
Jun 2018
471
New Hampshire
#46
My only concern is that there is no tangible evidence that the aborigines ever practiced agriculture to any great extent. No archaeological artifacts of any kind survive which would suggest that the indigenous peoples of Australia were ever an agricultural society at any point in their long history. Thus far nothing more technologically sophisticated that spears and boomerangs have been found. The only evidence are alleged "eyewitness" accounts.

Far more likely it would seem that the early explorers were engaging in fictional story telling in order to promote Ozland as a land of milk and honey ripe for settling.
 
May 2011
2,928
Rural Australia
#47
Likes: specul8

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,290
Australia
#48
My only concern is that there is no tangible evidence that the aborigines ever practiced agriculture to any great extent.
There is tangible evidence that practiced some agriculture. The problem with your stement is the use of the phrase ' to any great extent ' - which can mean anything , really .

No archaeological artifacts of any kind survive which would suggest that the indigenous peoples of Australia were ever an agricultural society at any point in their long history.
The threads dealing with this subject are full of 'tangible evidence' and 'arcaeological artifacts' , of many kinds ;

hoes, picks , grain storage caches , mill stones, etc. You need to read the info linked to and cited and watch the videos posted.


Thus far nothing more technologically sophisticated that spears and boomerangs have been found. The only evidence are alleged "eyewitness" accounts.
Well, some of those 'alledged' accounts where explorers whose duty it was to report things back to the authorities. History is the study of the human past as it is described in the written documents left by human beings .

Far more likely it would seem that the early explorers were engaging in fictional story telling in order to promote Ozland as a land of milk and honey ripe for settling.
Except some early explorers reported how they nearly died from its conditions, how harsh it was and how they had to be saved by the Aboriginals , or got scurvy, or died ! :D


So it isnt 'more likely' as you suppose . Also, you would need to show some historical evidence and back up for that, or its just ' suppozin ' .
 
Mar 2019
1,535
KL
#49
i dont think australian aboriginal people should be made something which they clearly weren't but such a thing should not be used as an excuse in declaring them something less, it was their choice in maintaining their thousands of year old tribal custom, how sentinalese fiercely defend their customs and traditions, its their choice, should be elevated from the reality or dishonoured for that.

growing out of tribalism has required great sacrifice of ancestral customs, culture, traditions, old values which some were willing and some not so much etc

a study of australian aboriginal should infact enlighten past of human race which has been preserved in them.

european settlers declared them as animals by theor law which was only repealed in 1960s which should have never happened in the first place.

regards
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,290
Australia
#50
i dont think australian aboriginal people should be made something which they clearly weren't but such a thing should not be used as an excuse in declaring them something less, it was their choice in maintaining their thousands of year old tribal custom, how sentinalese fiercely defend their customs and traditions, its their choice, should be elevated from the reality or dishonoured for that. .......

a study of australian aboriginal should infact enlighten past of human race which has been preserved in them.

european settlers declared them as animals by theor law which was only repealed in 1960s which should have never happened in the first place.

regards
One of the questions is ; what can we lean ? Well, I could write a fair bit on that !

For the moment , two things; In the top NW corner of Sth America, western ecologogists and scientists are working in collaboration with indigenous elders and learning more about the importance of 'increase sites' ( for specific species ) . If these areas are protected and managed as the indigenous have showed them, it protects the greater environment and allows development in other areas, creating less impact on the environment and species and enables them to recover from environmental disruption from past and preset development .

The scientists do not fully understand the process and why it works, but implementing the processes have shown marked improvements.

Similar work is underway in Australia

https://researchonline.jcu.edu.au/19269/1/mcIntyreTamwoy.pdf

The other thing I will mention is rather large, confronting and probably controversial . It is about learning to be kind and considerate . As simple as that.

eg see from 28 : 10



Thats one example - I can give many more, some from personal experience , generally, when I stayed with them I experienced it first hand . It might be the way I was treated, the way I saw animals treated , the consideration for other people .

It is interesting to note Ted Strehlow's comments - for which he was famously known .... and considering the story of Stehlow and the type of relationship he had with them ... and the HUGE later problems between them ;

" Notable remarks

"There had been no kinder folk anywhere than the Australian natives."​


At the moment we are stealing and mismanaging each others water, the rivers are sick and we are having massive fish die offs.