Dark Emu II: Precolonial Australian societies tilled the land

Mar 2019
1,801
Kansas
Typical of this sort of rubbish ..... they make 'suggestions' which are then left to be linked together somehow or to suggest something ( we dont know as it is never explained ) to the brilliant deductive knowledge of those entirely igorant in the subject at hand .
The show 'Ancient Aliens' does this brilliantly - After spilling whatever rubbish is the contents of the show, they always preface their closing comments "Ancient Alien Theorist suggest.......................

Like what exactly are the qualifications you would need to have to claim you are an Ancient alien theorist?
 

Kookaburra Jack

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,940
Rural Australia
By "out of Australia" are you referring to this theory?

IMO insufficient data at the moment.

This article makes some claims. Are they able to be validated?

* BOOMERANG: The oldest boomerang discovered in the world was found at Wyrie Swamp, South Australia, and is dated at 10,200 years.

Boomerang - Wikipedia

Boomerangs were, historically, used as hunting weapons, percussive musical instruments, battle clubs, fire-starters, decoys for hunting waterfowl, and as recreational play toys. The smallest boomerang may be less than 10 centimetres (4 in) from tip to tip, and the largest over 180 cm (5.9 ft) in length.[7] Tribal boomerangs may be inscribed or painted with designs meaningful to their makers. Most boomerangs seen today are of the tourist or competition sort, and are almost invariably of the returning type. Depictions of boomerangs being thrown at animals, such as kangaroos, appear in some of the oldest rock art in the world, the Indigenous Australian rock art of the Kimberly region, which is potentially up to 50,000 years old.[8]

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One boomerang that was discovered in Obłazowa Cave in the Carpathian Mountains in Poland was made of mammoth's tusk and is believed, based on AMS dating of objects found with it, to be about 30,000 years old.[14][15]
 

Kookaburra Jack

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,940
Rural Australia
This article makes some claims. Are they able to be validated?

* AXES: the oldest axe in the world, dated at 40,000 years, was found at Huon Terrace PNG (which was part of the Australian mainland until 8,000 years ago), others discovered in Jaowyn land, Northern Territory (35,500 years), at Sandy Creek, Queensland (32,000 years) and Malangangerr Northern Territory (23,000), are all at least 8,000 years older than the first axe found outside Australia (Niah Cave, Sarawak, 15,000 years).
Axe - Wikipedia

Initially axes were tools of stone called hand axes, used without handles (hafts), and had knapped (chipped) cutting edges of flint or other stone. Stone axes made with ground cutting edges were first developed sometime in the late Pleistocene in Australia, where ground-edge axe fragments from sites in Arnhem Land date back at least 44,000 years;[1][2]

ground-edge axes were later invented independently in Japan sometime around 38,000 BP, and are known from several Upper Palaeolithic sites on the islands of Honshu and Kyushu.[3] In Europe, however, the innovation of ground edges occurred much later, in the Neolithic period ending 4,000 to 2,000 BC. The first true hafted axes are known from the Mesolithic period (c. 6000 BC). Few wooden hafts have been found from this period, but it seems that the axe was normally hafted by wedging. Birch-tar and raw-hide lashings were used to fix the blade.

[1] Hiscock, P.; O'Connor, S.; Balme, J.; Maloney, T. (2016). "World's earliest ground-edge axe production coincides with human colonisation of Australia". Australian Archaeology. 82 (1): 2–11.

[2] Geneste, J.-M.; David, B.; Plisson, H.; Clarkson, C.; Delannoy, J.-J.; Petchey, F.; Whear, R. (2010). "Earliest evidence for ground-edge axes: 35,400 ± 410 cal BP from Jawoyn Country, Arnhem Land". Australian Archaeology. 71 (1): 66–69.
 

Kookaburra Jack

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,940
Rural Australia
This article makes some claims. Are they able to be validated?

* BOATS: Bradshaw art of the Kimberley area ... Within this area, he has discovered the oldest paintings of boats in the world, dated at a minimum age of 17,000 years, but with the strong possibility of being up to 50,000 years old ... "33 Walsh insisted that the "high prow of the boat"34 is "unnecessary for boats used in calm, inland waters. The design suggests it was used on the open ocean."


Bradshaw rock paintings - Wikipedia

The Gwion Gwion paintings, Bradshaw rock paintings, Bradshaw rock art, Bradshaw figures or The Bradshaws, are terms used to describe one of the two major regional traditions of rock art found in the north-west Kimberley region of Western Australia.[1] The identity of who painted these figures and the age of the art are contended within archaeology and amongst Australian rock art researchers.[2] These aspects have been debated since the works were first discovered and recorded by pastoralist Joseph Bradshaw in 1891, after whom they were named.[3] As the Kimberley is home to various Aboriginal language groups, the rock art is referred to and known by many different Aboriginal names, the most common of which are Gwion Gwion[4] or Giro Giro.[5] The art consists primarily of human figures ornamented with accessories such as bags, tassels and headdresses.

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Dating

The Bradshaws are not the regions' earliest paintings. The earlier art consists of crude animal drawings that are believed to be up to 40,000 years old. The Bradshaws have nothing in common with this earlier art and first appeared following the peak of the most recent Pleistocene glacial maximum, which is dated between 26,500 and 20,000 years ago.[22]

Since the mid-1990s, scientific dating methods have been used to determine the ages of the Bradshaw paintings. The methods have included, Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating (AMS) and Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). This was used when mud wasp nests have been built over paintings, and it gives a minimum age rather than an actual age of the painting. The results of this have revealed some inconsistency with Walsh's chronology. Experimental OSL dates from a wasp nest overlaying a tassel Bradshaw figure has given a Pleistocene date of 17,500±1,800 years BP.​

Boat - Wikipedia

Boats have served as transportation since the earliest times.[2] Circumstantial evidence, such as the early settlement of Australia over 40,000 years ago, findings in Crete dated 130,000 years ago,[3] and in Flores dated to 900,000 years ago,[4] suggest that boats have been used since prehistoric times. The earliest boats are thought to have been dugouts,[5] and the oldest boats found by archaeological excavation date from around 7,000–10,000 years ago. The oldest recovered boat in the world, the Pesse canoe, found in the Netherlands, is a dugout made from the hollowed tree trunk of a Pinus sylvestris that was constructed somewhere between 8200 and 7600 BC.​
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,013
Italy, Lago Maggiore
As member of the staff of Historum I have to congratulate with the participants to this thread: sure this "release 2.0" is going well better than the original one. And personally I think that Australian prehistory deserves this.

Now, using the official color of the members of the staff ...

Keep up with the good work.
 

Kookaburra Jack

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,940
Rural Australia
As member of the staff of Historum I have to congratulate with the participants to this thread: sure this "release 2.0" is going well better than the original one. And personally I think that Australian prehistory deserves this.
I completely agree. The Australian education system until the late 1970's was running with a curriculum (with respect to the precolonial Australian society) that was assembled in the 1890's. As a result it was focused on the achievements of the colonial victors, and downplayed the precolonial society.

Someone said that science advances as the old generation passes. The same may be said of the general historical knowledge of the achievements of the precolonial Australian society.

The author in the OP has brought out another book - for children.

Young Dark Emu

Bruce Pascoe has collected a swathe of literary awards for Dark Emu and now he has brought together the research and compelling first person accounts in a book for younger readers. Using the accounts of early European explorers, colonists and farmers, Bruce Pascoe compellingly argues for a reconsideration of the hunter-gatherer label for pre-colonial Aboriginal Australians.

He allows the reader to see Australia as it was before Europeans arrived – a land of cultivated farming areas, productive fisheries, permanent homes, and an understanding of the environment and its natural resources that supported thriving villages across the continent. Young Dark Emu - A Truer History asks young readers to consider a different version of Australia’s history pre-European colonisation.​
 
Mar 2019
1,801
Kansas
I completely agree. The Australian education system until the late 1970's was running with a curriculum (with respect to the precolonial Australian society) that was assembled in the 1890's. As a result it was focused on the achievements of the colonial victors, and downplayed the precolonial society.
In primary school in the late 60s the only mention of Aboriginals was a chapter in our history book showing Cook and some crew shooting at the locals on a beach and the aboriginals running off in terror. The title of the image was "Australia's first defense"

And that was all she wrote - except a bit about the esteemed Bennelong.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,375
Australia
I used to live near Kurnell , Cook's 'landing place' ; each year they would do some type of re-enactment of that , my father used to take us to watch it .... for some reason.

On the other side , of the heads to Botany Bay, at 'La Perouse ' was a modern Aboriginal settlement . On the weekends the men had a snake and reptile show, spear and boomerang demo, etc . The women developed a 'shell craft' collecting shells and decorating things with them. We used to get taken to that too . The place has an interesting history, helping displaced indigenous for many years .


" Some of the Aboriginal community of La Perouse have an unbroken connection to the land for over 7500 years. Members of the Timbery family living in La Perouse today can trace their ancestors back to pre-contact times . "


La Perouse Mission Church | NSW Environment & Heritage