Dark Emu: Precolonial Australian native society - agricultural or hunter-gatherer?

Ayrton

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,156
Bendigo
http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/rn/podcast/2013/12/bst_20131216_0636.mp3

I found an audio interview of this author, and made the following notes:

Cane bases a possible 60,000 years ago landfall mostly on archaeological remains​
suggested to be in association with luminescence dates from four well known sites:​
Lake Mungo, Devils Lair, Nauwalabila, and Madjedbebe (Malakunanja II).​
Scott Caine on earliest arrival ...​
Arhnem 61,000 (500 kms from coast)​
SW dates 50,000​
TAS glacial 46,000​
Mungo 52,000​
45,000 Painting Marsupial Lion Philcalea. Leopard like​
6000 galleries, countless thousands of artworks​
25000 Pilbira Region and elsewhere - earliest depiction of faces (70 images)​
Claims that even if these depictions of faces were to be 10,000 years old,​
these are the earliest depictions of the human face.​

Is this claim correct? What is the earliest depiction of the human face from Europe or Asia or elsewhere?
Finding all these posts fascinating, Jack. I am keeping an eye on things here, but staying a little uninvolved to avoid conflict. Keep up the good work.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,355
Australia
Humans left Africa at least a hundred thousand years before the Toba event.
Earliest Human Remains Outside Africa Were Just Discovered in Israel | Science | Smithsonian

This is supported by the recent Moroccan find
Ancient Fossils from Morocco Mess Up Modern Human Origins

Good stuff Dan. We may be able to expect more of this, our theories are really only based on 'what we have found so far .

I think two dynamics may have contributed to this ; an 'ancient Sahara Pump Theory' and the 'Gulf Entrance Shifting Sandbar Theory ' . (okay, I made up the last one ) .

At times, not just 'geologically recently' but going far back, the Sahara area may have been fertile and a corridor to the north African / Mediterranean coast . Early peoples may have ended up there, but not continued, or moved on, or moved back. But it appears some remains are present . At other times the desertification of the Sahara would have been a barrier, driving people towards the Nile valley area, / route .

Sahara pump theory - Wikipedia

As far as remains in Israel go (and some other very early evidence elsewhere related to that 'route' ) as opposed to early settlement in SEA, that depends on which way migrations went, following the coast and during what era ; one that had a sandbar crossing across the gulfs allowed coastal ingress across to India. At times of no sand bars, coastal 'beach combing migratory' would have followed the coast up the Red Sea, or up the Persian Gulf .

1538254951415.png
 
May 2011
2,652
Rural Australia
May 2011
2,652
Rural Australia
Good stuff Dan. We may be able to expect more of this, our theories are really only based on 'what we have found so far .
This is a good point specul8. I was not aware that the "Out of Africa" theory proposed various "waves" at different times, and how close the "last wave" coincides with the settlement of Australia by the ancestors of the First People.

Another aspect of future discoveries involves various new dating technologies. My further research following on after reading this book "Dark Emu" indicates that some of the techniques used in Australia are very new. Like those at Madjedbebe - How old is this [61,000 years?]

On a personal notes my travels, as you know to QLD, have brought me adjacent to this park:
Jebribillum Bora Park - Wikipedia

The Jebribillum Bora Park (also known as Jebbribillum) is located on the south eastern corner of the Gold Coast Highway and 6th Avenue in Burleigh Heads, Queensland, Australia. It contains one of the last intact bora rings on the Gold Coast, which is protected by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984,[1][2] and the first Queensland War Memorial specifically dedicated to Indigenous service men and women, which is protected by the Gold Coast Local Heritage Register.

///

The Bora Memorial Rock was installed beside the bora ring in 1991 and has a special association with the Yugambeh people.[15] It is dedicated to Indigenous men and women who served in Australian wars between 1914 and 1991.[16]



The rock for the memorial was brought from Tambourine Mountain, and the artwork of tribal totems was designed and painted with local ochre by Marshall Bell in consultation with the Kombumerri Aboriginal Corporation.​
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,355
Australia
I often stop at 'Tucki - tucki ' its right by the road on the 'back way' into Lismore ;

View attachment 12705


The reason it is so 'extant' is that they built a cemetery next to it and preserved the area from development, farming, etc .

It is still pretty 'active' . . . although many indigenous feel 'strange' about it , as its next to a European burial place .
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,355
Australia
I assume they were self seeded after the ceremonies there were disrupted, someone must have kept the ring and inner ground clear to preserve it . I also assume the area was fairly clear originally , in the picture above you can see the plains in the distance, it offers a great view 'over country' *

Outside of the grounds around the ring are paddocks, so they are cleared of trees, as it is on the other side where it abuts the cemetery, giving the appearance that the ring has a grove of trees around it .


* " The earthen structures are not the only location of significance: the site itself is the location of spiritual energy, and they are parts of significant landscapes. The best approach to managing these sites is as significant nodes within a perceived spiritual and real landscape. Preserving an earthen ring within an area only slightly larger than itself is undesirable on several counts. It draws attention to the site; it ignores the fact that it was part of a ceremonial complex; it ignores the fact that it was part of a wider social, economic and spiritual landscape. At the other end of the scale, the entire area within which bora sites occurred could be seen as a continuous spiritual landscape, and conserving it in its entirety is hardly feasible. So clearly some compromises must be sought. "

http://johnwatsonsite.com/MyClassNotes/Topics/Poetry/Bora Rings.html

I can affirm, through personal experience as well, that Tucki Tucki bora ring is certainly still 'active' .
 
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