Dark Emu: Precolonial Australian native society - agricultural or hunter-gatherer?

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specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,351
Australia
How much of it is distinguishable from what stone age tribes did? Whenever someone says "indigenous people in Australia had that", what they really mean is "they had a version of it, under definition xyz, but that version was stuff stone age tribes also had", which is kind of the problem with invoking this stuff as a rebuttal to "weren't they a stone age people?" I don't think it's due to any natural superiority, etc, nobody has even hinted at that, I would think the environmental factors, chance, geographic location, etc, explain the lack of development; but that they lacked development isn't something one can debate. It's like when someone said they had "mining", but the version of "mining" they had was hacking hunks of clay out of the side of caves that had clay in it, using sticks. It's not the sophisticated and technical process evoked to the layperson by the term mining.
Nope ! YOU claimed they had no tools .


"The indigenous people's did not have writing or tools, for agriculture or otherwise . "

And that was what KJ was responding to so this answer is totally irrelevant. You are dead wrong that they never had tools of any type ( ie. or otherwise ) actually, its just a silly and stupid statement as the museums are full of them . You continually make BS assertions, then when taken to task, give an entirely unrelated response or cover up or more BS.

Same with the mining , you just made up the process you described with no reference to reality whatsoever , yet again, you are making stuff up yourself and then criticizing what you made up yourself.

When we explained the complexities of their mining process, and why it is considered 'mining' and backed it up with references and papers about it that supported what we aid, you just chose to ignore that and keep repeating your unbacked up claims ,

ANOTHER fail !

All the way through this you have been failing , badly and obvciously, and have not offered up any relevent f fact or reference.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,351
Australia
Yeah, we have some pretty good sized wild boars where I live. Big as bears with tusks like razors. You definitely want to make sure you get a clean shot otherwise one of those buggers will tear you to shreds. Nothing lighter than a 30-06, though personally I prefer my Weatherby 300 magnum. Did not know there were wild boar in Australia, though considering the ones that live here were originally European imports it doesn't surprise me.

Didn't realize that about kangaroo meat, as I had eaten it only once. Someone ordered it for me from an exotic meat website as a Christmas gift. Though I still wouldn't mind going kangaroo hunting, as deer can be dazzled in a similar manner. Though that is illegal in most states.

Gator is some of the best meat I've ever eaten. I wasn't aware crocodile could be eaten as a matter of fact. I heard the meat sticks to the armor plating or something along those lines. Heard it was nearly inedible. Though big game hunting for a massive 20ft 20000+ lb saltwater crocodile in the outback would be well worth the effort at any rate.
LIke I said, the girls like to run down the boars after their dogs, that is, and finish them off with HUGE knife. 'Bacon Buster Babes' they call them.

You can get a subs if you want

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I didnt find croc inedible at all .... a bit like watery chicken with a slight prawn like texture. 'Cept the Chef put some crappy hipster sauce all over it :(

What you DONT want to try is goanna .. well, the meat is probably okay, but 'the boys' saved the 'best bit ' for me , the bit they save for top man or elders ... they where trying to be polite ... it is a fat storage gland near the back leg .... it had a soft.crunchy texture, again , a bit like a prawn, but when I bit into it it released a gush of goanna oil around my mouth and down my throat.

WHOA ! No way I could eat it and a bunch of wild looking hunters waiting expectantly for my approval, AFTER I finished eating it, which I couldnt . I manged to excuse myself saying it was making me feel strangely sick ... which they didnt like ... and then I said, so strangely sick it aint natural ... maybe goanna is one of my totems ? Then they got worried and said 'Oh! You better not eat him then ! " and took it away .

:D That was close call . But might not worry you Swampy ... you probably neck the whole lizard down in one go !
 
Likes: Swamp Booger
Jun 2018
504
New Hampshire
LIke I said, the girls like to run down the boars after their dogs, that is, and finish them off with HUGE knife. 'Bacon Buster Babes' they call them.

You can get a subs if you want

View attachment 17803

I didnt find croc inedible at all .... a bit like watery chicken with a slight prawn like texture. 'Cept the Chef put some crappy hipster sauce all over it :(

What you DONT want to try is goanna .. well, the meat is probably okay, but 'the boys' saved the 'best bit ' for me , the bit they save for top man or elders ... they where trying to be polite ... it is a fat storage gland near the back leg .... it had a soft.crunchy texture, again , a bit like a prawn, but when I bit into it it released a gush of goanna oil around my mouth and down my throat.

WHOA ! No way I could eat it and a bunch of wild looking hunters waiting expectantly for my approval, AFTER I finished eating it, which I couldnt . I manged to excuse myself saying it was making me feel strangely sick ... which they didnt like ... and then I said, so strangely sick it aint natural ... maybe goanna is one of my totems ? Then they got worried and said 'Oh! You better not eat him then ! " and took it away .

:D That was close call . But might not worry you Swampy ... you probably neck the whole lizard down in one go !
Man, I outta go to Australia one of these days. Sounds like a prime hunting and fishing destination, two of my favorite pastimes. What are the laws on transporting firearms for the purpose of hunting? Say a Weatherby 300 Magnum bolt action rifle?
 
Aug 2014
4,675
Australia
Man, I outta go to Australia one of these days. Sounds like a prime hunting and fishing destination, two of my favorite pastimes. What are the laws on transporting firearms for the purpose of hunting? Say a Weatherby 300 Magnum bolt action rifle?
You would first need an Australian firearms licence. Not easy to acquire from another country. Best bet is to come over first, get all the required paperwork, and then try importing your firearms.
 
Likes: Swamp Booger
Jun 2018
504
New Hampshire
Nope ! YOU claimed they had no tools .


"The indigenous people's did not have writing or tools, for agriculture or otherwise . "

And that was what KJ was responding to so this answer is totally irrelevant. You are dead wrong that they never had tools of any type ( ie. or otherwise ) actually, its just a silly and stupid statement as the museums are full of them . You continually make BS assertions, then when taken to task, give an entirely unrelated response or cover up or more BS.

Same with the mining , you just made up the process you described with no reference to reality whatsoever , yet again, you are making stuff up yourself and then criticizing what you made up yourself.

When we explained the complexities of their mining process, and why it is considered 'mining' and backed it up with references and papers about it that supported what we aid, you just chose to ignore that and keep repeating your unbacked up claims ,

ANOTHER fail !

All the way through this you have been failing , badly and obvciously, and have not offered up any relevent f fact or reference.
I am not saying that Australian aborigines were not an effective society, and I don't think Caesarmagnus is claiming this either. It is evident, that aboriginal clans were well suited to adapt and thrive in the environment of the Australian Outback. I don't think anyone is arguing against this.

What we are arguing, however, is that Australian aboriginal society (the term civilization cannot be used here without doing unjust violence to its meaning) was at a stone age level and certainly not as advanced as contemporary societies and genuine civilizations in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas. As most historians, myself included, define civilization and advanced societies based upon technological advancement (such as metallurgy, irrigation, urbanization etc...), the presence of agriculture, a sophisticated governmental system (usually a monarchy or city state), and a written language. The Australian aborigines possessed none of these characteristics, the possible exception being a very rudimentary form of agriculture which consisted of spreading seed along a trail and returning to harvest the crop.

Regarding a form of government, the aborigines were uniformly at the clan level. They do not appear to have progressed any further along in cultural complexity. They did not develop the strong centralized monarchies of China, Egypt, Mesopotamia, or late medieval Europe. Nor did they develop a city state system such as in ancient Greece or Mesoamerica. They didn't develop a feudal system similar to that of early medieval Europe or Japan. They didn't even develop a system of government such as the Iroquois Confederacy, which was a few short steps above their own.

I am not at all claiming the aborigines did not have their merits, they certainly did. They were a society of hunter/gatherers who were well adapted to their harsh environment, and maintained a level of cultural complexity that was conducive to the situation inherent on the Australian continent. But they were not a civilization, and they did not achieve a level of cultural complexity comparable to more sophisticated societies around the world. They do not seem to have advanced beyond the cusp of the Neolithic Revolution in some isolated instances. And even this comparison is being generous.
 
Likes: Caesarmagnus
Jun 2018
504
New Hampshire
Nope ! YOU claimed they had no tools .


"The indigenous people's did not have writing or tools, for agriculture or otherwise . "

And that was what KJ was responding to so this answer is totally irrelevant. You are dead wrong that they never had tools of any type ( ie. or otherwise ) actually, its just a silly and stupid statement as the museums are full of them . You continually make BS assertions, then when taken to task, give an entirely unrelated response or cover up or more BS.

Same with the mining , you just made up the process you described with no reference to reality whatsoever , yet again, you are making stuff up yourself and then criticizing what you made up yourself.

When we explained the complexities of their mining process, and why it is considered 'mining' and backed it up with references and papers about it that supported what we aid, you just chose to ignore that and keep repeating your unbacked up claims ,

ANOTHER fail !

All the way through this you have been failing , badly and obvciously, and have not offered up any relevent f fact or reference.
Well, it is true that the indigenous peoples of Australia did not develop a written language.

While it is possible to develop a sophisticated alternative to a written language, such as the corded knot system used by the Inca Empire, the aborigines do not seem to have had developed any abstract system for the purpose of recording their language.
 
Jun 2018
504
New Hampshire
Dark Emu! Ahahahahahahahaha Dark Emu! Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha Dark Emu!!!!!!!!!!! Mwahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahhahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Dark Emu *gasp* hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I can't get over how funny that name is! As if emus are fearsome warrior animals! Big goofy birds! Ahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 100lbs of overgrown poultry! Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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