Mar 2019
7
United States
#1
Hello everyone,

I am interested in combining my love of history with my data analysis skills. I have a blog that focuses on a new history topic every month. This blog has two posts a month one on a history topic and the other on the code I used to do the analysis and visualizations. This is really just a hobby for me but I was hoping to find others who were interested in combining data analysis with history, what datasets are out there for different history topics, and links to blogs along similar focuses.

The first posts I did were on ancient libraries

The blog post on the libraries can be found here: Hist01 – Article – Libraries, the Knowledge Centers of the Ancient World
The blog post on the code I used to create the data, make the visualizations, and analysis can be found here: Hist01 – Python Code – Libraries, the Knowledge Centers of the Ancient World

The next posts will be out in April about pirates:
Hist02 – Next History Topic – Pirates

Anyways would love to hear from anyone who has similar interest! Thanks so much!

Tiffany
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,559
SoCal
#2
Very interesting blog! :)

BTW, have you ever considered editing Wikipedia and creating/expanding articles on there? I do it (over 50 of the articles that I created and/or expanded ended up on the Wikipedia front page) and I think that it's a great way to share one's knowledge and information with the wider community. :)
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,559
SoCal
#4
Yeah, I mean, if you know of some useful information that hasn't been put on Wikipedia yet and are able to properly source this information, editing Wikipedia might sound like something that you would be good at doing. Heck, you could even use your mapmaking skills and graphics skills to create maps and/or graphics to put on Wikipedia.

If you write a long enough article and/or expand an article long enough, you could even get your Wikipedia articles to be put on Wikipedia's front page so that much more people are going to see them and read them. :)
 
#5
i think i would add SEA ancient library culture as well

Aside from the historic religious monument that is the Angkor Wat, there are thousands of temples built during the Angkor period that house similar structures to that of the Khmer version of a library.

Temples such as those found in Prasat Banteay Chhmar, Preah Khan Kampong Svay and Beng Mealea have been found to contain grand library structures on its grounds.

Sambo Manara, a history professor at the Royal University of Phnom Penh and Pannasastra University of Cambodia, said that when it came to the preservation of documents, Cambodian ancestors had perfected this art form.

“If we look at the Angkor Era, we will see thousands of libraries across public gatherings on Cambodian territories and previous Khmer territories,” he said.

“It’s important to remember that wherever a temple was built, there will also be a ‘Thormatrai’ which acts as a modern day library. Furthermore, on the grounds of Angkor Wat, there are two buildings which were called the libraries of Angkor Wat.”

Klot Vibolla, who has been a general manager of the National Library of Cambodia since 2003, said Cambodians should be proud that the beautiful structures of the libraries have been preserved.

“We should be immensely proud that the grand library had been passed down from our ancestors from thousands of years ago,” Vibolla said.

Meanwhile, Hin Sophorn, an expert on culture and archaeology and deputy director at the Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts office in Kampong Thom, said libraries have a deep-rooted history in Cambodia.

“Amongst the Prasat Sambor ruins in the Sambor Prei Kuk area, we found many structures similar to that of a library scattered within the vicinity,” he said.

“It contained a seventh-century architectural design, dating back to even before the Angkor era.”
Pitakataik (Bagan) - Wikipedia

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Pitakataik (Bagan)

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angkor wat library
 
Mar 2019
7
United States
#6
Thank you so much for responding about this. This is what I was hoping to hear from people. I would love to grow this out as I believe there are far more libraries than the ones I found on the wiki page. The time frame I found for ancient times is between 3500 B.C. and 500 A.D. I did not add any libraries past that point. Looking at the Angkor Wat Library I believe that it was built between the 9th and 12th century. If so then it would not fall into this category. If my date range is off, please let me know. Regardless thank you for sharing this wealth of information. Angkor Wat is on my wish list of places to go. Thank you so much! If there are other libraries/Thormatrai (with dates and idea of location) that you know fall between 3500 B.C. and 500 A.D. let me know and I will do my best to add them.
 

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