De-emphasis of Christianity in Treaty of Tripoli: gesture of appeasement?

Aug 2013
613
Pomerium
#1
Provided that the USA in the 1790s was a mediocre regional power at best, isn't it obvious that the Americans de-emphasized Christianity in relation to Americana in the Treaty of Tripoli in order to appease the corsairs?
 

Code Blue

Ad Honorem
Feb 2015
3,980
Caribbean
#3
Provided that the USA in the 1790s was a mediocre regional power at best, isn't it obvious that the Americans de-emphasized Christianity in relation to Americana in the Treaty of Tripoli in order to appease the corsairs?
It is very obvious. If the pirates believed that, they would not have spent the previous 30 years looting US ships. Jefferson met with some of the leaders when he was in Paris and tried to negotiate his way out of paying the infidel tribute. It didn't work.

From the Articles of Association (First Continental Congress), 1774
"And in prosecution of the same system, several late, cruel, and oppressive acts have been passed, respecting the town of Boston and the Massachusetts-Bay, and also an act for extending the province of Quebec, so as to border on the western frontiers of these colonies, establishing an arbitrary government therein, and discouraging the settlement of British subjects in that wide extended country; thus, by the influence of civil principles and ancient prejudices, to dispose the inhabitants to act with hostility against the free Protestant colonies, whenever a wicked ministry shall chuse so to direct them."
Avalon Project - Journals of the Coninental Congress - The Articles of Association; October 20, 1774

The Americans knew who and what they were and the Barbary Pirates knew as well.
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,211
#4
It was just consistent with the American Constitution.
The First Amendment says "Congress shall make no act respecting the establishment of religion nor prohibiting the free exercise thereof". At that time the Congregationalist religion was established in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Hampshire, and presumably the Amendment meant the federal government couldn't interfere with that.

In colonial times, the Anglican Church was established in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, and New York.

In Virginia, no church was allowed to exist that was not Anglican. As a result, there were essentially no Puritans, Catholics or Jews in Virginia. In later colonial times, Baptists met out doors. German Lutheran clergymen in Virginia had to go to England and be trained and ordained as Anglican priests.

The Anglican Church was pretty much destroyed in the American Revolution, with most of the clergy and many of the members leaving for Bermuda, Canada, etc.

The Constitution was not non Christian, but it was non sectarian, as there were several different religions.

Christianity is not mentioned in other treaties of that time involving the US, and it certainly would not be mentioned in a treaty with Muslims.
 

Code Blue

Ad Honorem
Feb 2015
3,980
Caribbean
#5
Christianity is not mentioned in other treaties of that time involving the US, and it certainly would not be mentioned in a treaty with Muslims.
George III was not mentioned in the Declaration of Independence, but everyone knew to whom the document referred.

Everyone knew back then as we know now, the US if full of Christians.
 
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Mar 2012
18,030
In the bag of ecstatic squirt
#7
The First Amendment says "Congress shall make no act respecting the establishment of religion nor prohibiting the free exercise thereof". At that time the Congregationalist religion was established in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Hampshire, and presumably the Amendment meant the federal government couldn't interfere with that.

In colonial times, the Anglican Church was established in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, and New York.

In Virginia, no church was allowed to exist that was not Anglican. As a result, there were essentially no Puritans, Catholics or Jews in Virginia. In later colonial times, Baptists met out doors. German Lutheran clergymen in Virginia had to go to England and be trained and ordained as Anglican priests.

The Anglican Church was pretty much destroyed in the American Revolution, with most of the clergy and many of the members leaving for Bermuda, Canada, etc.

The Constitution was not non Christian, but it was non sectarian, as there were several different religions.

Christianity is not mentioned in other treaties of that time involving the US, and it certainly would not be mentioned in a treaty with Muslims.
Truly, the culture by the people is being reflected in their set of laws. While the U.S. Constitution never give any religion an advantage over the rest, the Americans during the formative years of their nationhood created laws that reflect of who they were.

Not to mention the practice of slavery which was a violation of the fundamental law.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,211
#8
Truly, the culture by the people is being reflected in their set of laws. While the U.S. Constitution never give any religion an advantage over the rest, the Americans during the formative years of their nationhood created laws that reflect of who they were.

Not to mention the practice of slavery which was a violation of the fundamental law.
The American Revolution was partly a revolution against the Anglican Church. There wasn't one main religion at the time of the Constitution. There were Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Unitarians, Dutch Reformed, Quakers, Lutherans, Roman Catholics, Baptists, Methodists, and Jews.
 
#9
Truly, the culture by the people is being reflected in their set of laws. While the U.S. Constitution never give any religion an advantage over the rest, the Americans during the formative years of their nationhood created laws that reflect of who they were.

Not to mention the practice of slavery which was a violation of the fundamental law.

What fundamental law?

Far from forbidding slavery, the Constitution specifically protected the right of slaveowners to reclam runaways.
 

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