Dead King led Army to Battle

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,256
T'Republic of Yorkshire
Nemowork , I've always though that Barabarossa died taked by a mountain stream and his body lost
this giving rise to the ( so banal ) legend of him returning to save the Germans in their hour of greatest need

maybe I read too much rubbish :oops:
There seems to be a lot of legends of "the once and future king" all over Europe. It's probably worth a thread on its own.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,905
Portugal
Abdul Malik led his army against the Portugese crusaders strapped to his saddle but dying. He expired near the end of the battle but the ruse that he was still alive was maintained till the end.
Your reference o the Portuguese crusaders confused me for a moment. I presume you are talking about this man: Abu Marwan Abd al-Malik I Saadi - Wikipedia, sultan of Morocco that died at the battle of Alcácer-Quibir (1578). Interesting myths and histories were forged around that battle.
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,686
Cornwall
Your reference o the Portuguese crusaders confused me for a moment. I presume you are talking about this man: Abu Marwan Abd al-Malik I Saadi - Wikipedia, sultan of Morocco that died at the battle of Alcácer-Quibir (1578). Interesting myths and histories were forged around that battle.
Not sure who writes the worst history. Christian sources referring to heathens etc etc or arabic sources where any soldier from a Christian country is a 'crusader'
 
Feb 2019
345
California
Except that he wasn't a king and he died of natural causes on 9th July 1099.

The Battle of Cuarte on which that daft finale to the film is probably based was on 21st October 1094 - where a very much alive Cid thrashed a much superior Almoravid army with a combination of powerr, brains and surprise - far more exciting than the 'legend' in fact
Oh yes--I've never doubted that the legend is a legend--but the legend is about El Cid.
 
Jun 2017
462
maine
Edward I " longshanks ", the hammer of the Scots , requested that his body be boiled , the bones tied together
put on a horse and led in front of his army to ride to battle again against the pesky Scots of Robert the Bruce
Robert the Bruce himself had something somewhat similar done. He died in Scotland and his old associate, Sir James Douglas, took his heart--intending to bring it to the Holy Land. However, Douglas became involved in a battle against the Moors, apparently realized that he wasn't going to make it out alive, and threw the heart into the midst of his enemy.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,016
Sydney
" and threw the heart into the midst of his enemy. " .........charging after it so said the legend
 

Lord Oda Nobunaga

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
5,615
Ontario, Canada
Has anyone ever heard/read about a King who died hours before Battle. Before he died, he ordered his people that upon death, he was to be wrapped and placed on his horse as his intention was to still lead his army to Battle.

When the enemy saw a dead person leading the living, they retreated!

I can't remember where I read/heard this story. Kindly help
This was also a legend associated with the Han chancellor Zhuge Liang.
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,686
Cornwall
Robert the Bruce himself had something somewhat similar done. He died in Scotland and his old associate, Sir James Douglas, took his heart--intending to bring it to the Holy Land. However, Douglas became involved in a battle against the Moors, apparently realized that he wasn't going to make it out alive, and threw the heart into the midst of his enemy.
I think I've done a thread on this somewhere in the past. One of the most hare-brained schemes in history somehow passed off as a glamorous event.

James Douglas and some fellow knights decided to fulfil Robert the Bruce's wish of going on Crusade by taking his heart along in a casket. Unable to find a suitable crusade they pitched up in Spain and tagged along with a Castillian expedition against the Kingdom of Granada at Teba in 1330. It all ended in farce when the Scottish mercenaries were surrounded and killed - either through bad luck or incompetence presumably - what would they know of Granadino/Spanish tactics?

The upshot is that the casket containing the heart of Robert the Bruce was picked up by Granadino forces and ended up with a bemused Mohammed IV of Granada who, being a decent sort of chap, had it sent to Alfonso XI and hence back to Scotland for proper burial.

Someone made up a glorious tale of a surrounded Douglas making a speech and hurling the casket into the Granadino cavalry - well really? It's a wonder he had the time in between dodging lances and swords!!
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,686
Cornwall
One of the sad aspects of history is that facts ruin a perfectly good story! :)
Indeed - a bit like a local priest suddenly happening upon some bones of St James the Apostle in Galicia, Spain. :lol:

On reflection I don't think they were all killed, some of his companions retrieved the casket from Alfonso. Etc