Developments of plush or stuffed animals

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,292
Brassicaland
#1
Plush animals, soft toys, stuffies, stuffed animals, all refer to the same thing.
Arctophile is a lover of teddy bears; we can deduce that teddy bears were the quintessential stuffies.
Soft toys must have a long history; and some of my relatives prefer stuffies over real animals.
They are also becoming toys that cross the age and gender barrier.
How did plush animals become common?
Did "cuteness" matter here?
When did the first "stuffies" emerge?
 
Sep 2012
907
Prague, Czech Republic
#2
Plush animals, soft toys, stuffies, stuffed animals, all refer to the same thing.
Arctophile is a lover of teddy bears; we can deduce that teddy bears were the quintessential stuffies.
Soft toys must have a long history; and some of my relatives prefer stuffies over real animals.
They are also becoming toys that cross the age and gender barrier.
How did plush animals become common?
Did "cuteness" matter here?
When did the first "stuffies" emerge?

A bit of googling led me to this, a doll made out of linen stuffed with rags and papyrus. It's from Roman Egypt, and is now in the British Museum.


According to Wikipedia, the transition to modern plush fabrics was led by the German Steiff company at the end of the 19th century, which used technology stemming from the furniture industry for making upholstery and still makes stuffed toys today. Their first productions were elephants intended to be used as pin cushions, but upon noting their popularity with children they marketed to them and diversified to other animals. This quickly caught on among other companies across Europe and the US.
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,521
Dispargum
#3
^That fits with the story that the teddy bear was named after Teddy Roosevelt in 1902. The Steiff Company started manufacturing and marketing teddy bears in 1903. They were not the first company to do so, only one of many.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,292
Brassicaland
#4


These are a few of my own; while modern plush animals started in Germany, most of them are made in China today.
You can build your own stuffies today. I recalled Pets at Sea on a Royal Caribbean cruise trip.....
When did polyester come into place for stuffies?
 

Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,258
South of the barcodes
#6
It would make an interesting development on Animal hospital.


"I'm sorry kids, we cant fix Shep but there's one way he can still come home with you!"
 
Mar 2017
858
Colorado
#8
I couldn't find any pictures on Google.

In the late 70's, a British stuffed animal place cranked up a collector's series of Winnie the Pooh. Not those Disney monstrosities, but dead-on realizations of Mr. Shepard's original drawings. Roo is very close to being an inkblot.

My Aunt saw them in a store and bought me 60% of the set. There were so good, so much like the drawings, I thought they might be valuable some day.
"Can you get me the rest?"

My Aunt was the kind of bubbling, charming woman everyone loved on first sight. The factory had stopped making them months before, but she somehow talked them into making the missing characters for their "important American customer."

So I have the last ones ever made.

Maybe they'll be worth something, probably not. They've been in sealed plastic boxes for years, but they still give me pleasure to think about them (I learned to read with Winnie the Pooh, When Were Very Young, etc.).
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,292
Brassicaland
#10
I couldn't find any pictures on Google.

In the late 70's, a British stuffed animal place cranked up a collector's series of Winnie the Pooh. Not those Disney monstrosities, but dead-on realizations of Mr. Shepard's original drawings. Roo is very close to being an inkblot.

My Aunt saw them in a store and bought me 60% of the set. There were so good, so much like the drawings, I thought they might be valuable some day.
"Can you get me the rest?"

My Aunt was the kind of bubbling, charming woman everyone loved on first sight. The factory had stopped making them months before, but she somehow talked them into making the missing characters for their "important American customer."

So I have the last ones ever made.

Maybe they'll be worth something, probably not. They've been in sealed plastic boxes for years, but they still give me pleasure to think about them (I learned to read with Winnie the Pooh, When Were Very Young, etc.).


Is this what you mean rather than Disney's interpretations?