Did any country ever have a sex ratio for middle-aged people lower than Russia had in 1950?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,731
SoCal
According to the map here, for people aged 25 to 49 in 1950, there were only 62 men for every 100 women in Russia:



Other parts of the Soviet Union--such as Ukraine, Belarus, Latvia, and Estonia--fared slightly better than Russia, but not too much. Germany also suffered heavy losses for its middle-aged male cohorts, but not as severe as Russia and various other Soviet SSRs.

In turn, this raises an interesting question--were there ever any countries that had an even lower ratio of males to females for their middle-aged people (in comparison to Russia in 1950, of course)? If so, which countries and when?
 
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Mar 2019
1,801
Kansas
In turn, this raises an interesting question--were there ever any countries that had an even lower ratio of males to females for their middle-aged people (in comparison to Russia in 1950, of course)? If so, which countries and when?
Yes Paraguay after the 1870 war. In most areas there was only 25 men per 100 women and the worst affected areas it was only 5 men to every 100 women.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,731
SoCal
Yes Paraguay after the 1870 war. In most areas there was only 25 men per 100 women and the worst affected areas it was only 5 men to every 100 women.
One wonders how Paraguay was able to reproduce with such few men.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,731
SoCal
Well they probably died of exhaustion ;)
That could have created some serious issues, though. When there are such few men, there is a very real risk of half-siblings frequently marrying each other. In other words, the population could become very inbred.
 
Oct 2016
139
Ashland
Perhaps Germany 1946?
Aside from the Fallen, there were a great many POWs yet to be repatriated from the UK and the USSR.
One of the reasons, I suppose, for allowing the subsequent entry of thousands of Turkish 'Guest Workers' in the 1950s and 60s; which I believe many Germans came to regret.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,731
SoCal
Perhaps Germany 1946?
Aside from the Fallen, there were a great many POWs yet to be repatriated from the UK and the USSR.
One of the reasons, I suppose, for allowing the subsequent entry of thousands of Turkish 'Guest Workers' in the 1950s and 60s; which I believe many Germans came to regret.
Were a lot of German PoWs released between 1946 and 1950? After all, the map above shows the sex ratio for people aged 25-49 for Germany as well, and while it's certainly low, it's not as low as in Russia and most of the other European SSRs.
 
Oct 2016
139
Ashland
Were a lot of German PoWs released between 1946 and 1950? .
In the case of Great Britain a great many were released as late as 1950, after doing forced labor on farms and in war-damage clearance and the like; in the case of the USSR, many were never released at all (e.g., most of those who surrendered after Stalingrad.)
BTW, I'm not criticizing the detention policy of the UK; others have done that, but after the widespread destruction of the Blitz and the V-program it is not hard to see why it was adopted.
Thought-provoking Topic, inviting more research.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,731
SoCal
In the case of Great Britain a great many were released as late as 1950, after doing forced labor on farms and in war-damage clearance and the like; in the case of the USSR, many were never released at all (e.g., most of those who surrendered after Stalingrad.)
BTW, I'm not criticizing the detention policy of the UK; others have done that, but after the widespread destruction of the Blitz and the V-program it is not hard to see why it was adopted.
Thought-provoking Topic, inviting more research.
Interesting. Do you know what the exact number of Germans in Allied detention in 1946 was?