Did Aurangzeb Ban Cow Slaughter?

Apr 2018
69
Ayodhya
#1
Obviously Akbar is usually spoken of in connection with the ban on cow slaughter. However, while reading Bernier's account of India I stumbled upon a paragraph where he mentions that the brahmins secured a ban on cow slaughter by paying a sum of money to Aurangzeb. I have attached the screenshot to this post.

Is there are corroboration to this claim outside of Bernier, as per your knowledge?
 

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Likes: Ashoka maurya
Oct 2015
1,106
India
#4
@Raghavendra This extract is interesting.

Firstly, it suggests a economic reason (climate & nutrition) for banning cattle slaughter. Jahangir ordered it for some years. Brahmins offered money to Aurangzeb to ensure that he too orders, however, whether he accepted it & complied is not asserted here.

Secondly, it links vegetarianism to Indian doctrine of transmigration or rebirth.
 
Likes: Raghavendra
Apr 2018
69
Ayodhya
#5
@Raghavendra This extract is interesting.

Firstly, it suggests a economic reason (climate & nutrition) for banning cattle slaughter. Jahangir ordered it for some years. Brahmins offered money to Aurangzeb to ensure that he too orders, however, whether he accepted it & complied is not asserted here.

Secondly, it links vegetarianism to Indian doctrine of transmigration or rebirth.
The excerpt says that brahmins came to Aurangzeb with a request to ban cow slaughter, and "to ensure his compliance paid a sum". So, I think that hints at Aurangzeb charging a sum and them complying with the wish of the brahmins? And yeah, vegetarianism was quite common among gentiles (Hindus) in India, according to Bernier. In another letter to a Frenchman, he states that in Delhi the gentiles are vegetarians but the Moores (Muslims) eat meat. He later, in another letter, says that all castes of Hindus are vegetarians, sparing the kshatriyas who can eat all meat barring beef and peacock. He also mentions the holiness of the cow.
 
Apr 2018
69
Ayodhya
#6
aurangzeb was not as jihadist as some hindutvas make him out to be he had hindu generals of his army, the guy was involved with a hindu mistress/infedility before his death as well.

regards
Yeah, I think he had a romance with Hira Bai. But she died in a year, and he was left broken. According to Manucci, he even drank wine and enjoyed her singing and dancing while that romance lasted. After her death though, he stopped drinking wine. He also married Udaipuri Mahal, who was a wife of Dara, and married Aurangzeb after Dara's death. Manucci says that he was a Gregarian. However, from the name Udaipuri, it seems that she was from Udaipur. If that is true, it debunks the claims of the Ranas that they never gave a daughter to the Mughals.
 
Oct 2015
1,106
India
#7
Aurangzeb attempted to islamize Rana of Mewar by violence, but he failed. The rajputs enticed Aurangzeb's son, prince Akbar, to rebel against his father and declare himself as emperor - which Akbar did. After this Aurangzeb was forced to seek peace with Rana of Mewar, which the Rana delayed for five months because now it was Aurangzeb's need as he wanted to pursue prince Akbar.

Jijiya was also imposed around this time, which was supposed to islamize Hindus in a peaceful manner..

One should read translation of Manucci's 'Storia do Mogor' Volume-2, pp 233-255. Aurangzeb's attempt to islamize with use of force comes across very clearly as does his failure in the two-year long enterprise.
 
Oct 2015
1,106
India
#9
I searched thru the Indexes of of following books which are primary sources on Aurangzeb:

(i) Maasir-i-Alamgiri : The official Mughal record of Aurangzeb's deeds completed 2 or 3 years after his death

(ii) Storia do Mogor by Niccolao Manucci: An Italian traveler who came to India and settled here. Manucci lived thru the entire reign of Aurangzeb. He was employed in Mughal setups as artillery man (by Prince Dara, son of Aurangzeb. by and Mirza Raja Jai Singh, the topmost Hindu Raja who served in Aurangzeb's army) and as physician (to Prince Shah Alam, son of Aurangzeb).

Neither of the above talk about ban on cow slaughter.
 
Apr 2018
69
Ayodhya
#10
This is no end to propaganda literature trying to secularize Mughal emperors like Aurangzeb.
I don't think anyone seriously believes Aurangzeb was secular. A cow slaughter ban is guided by Hinduism, and thus not secular as the term implies the separation of religion and state laws. Most of his laws like Jizya, etc were guided by Islam.
 

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