Did Hungary's pre-WWI Magyarization policy include encouraging Hungarians to settle in the non-Hungarian parts of Hungary?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,692
SoCal
#41
Jews - nope, Slovaks - don't think so, Ruthenians -maybe? (some Ruthenian communities in today Romania lost the use of the language - not the customs/culture, AFAIK, although there wasn't an active, strong desnationalisation policy
Don't Ruthenians have a separate church from the Magyars, though?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,692
SoCal
#45
Diminutive for "Man". (but it's in a friendly/familiar way).

The most famous one remains the the Manneke pis in Brussels (these days he dressed a gillet jaune :D):

Was he made black on purpose? Is this supposed to symbolize Europe's increasing multiculturalism? Or is this simply a coincidence?
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
13,797
Europix
#48
Anyway, since this statue was made in the early 1600s, its color obviously has something to do with European multiculturalism.
It certainly does: Brussels is an extremely poluted town. Full of German, French, Japanese, Italian, American cars. Even Russian, now and then.

At a certain moment, everything and everyone becomes black.
 
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