Did Hungary's pre-WWI Magyarization policy include encouraging Hungarians to settle in the non-Hungarian parts of Hungary?

Futurist

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May 2014
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The question is how they ended in a enclave within an ethnic Romanian territory.
Their job was to guard the Hungarian frontier, no? Indeed, this is why there was likewise previously a large number of ethnic Germans stuck deep within Romanian-majority territory. Basically, the location that the Szekelys and Transylvanian Saxons (Germans) lived were close to the historical eastern borders of Hungary. Transylvania was a part of Hungary until 1918.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,783
SoCal
Their job was to guard the Hungarian frontier, no? Indeed, this is why there was likewise previously a large number of ethnic Germans stuck deep within Romanian-majority territory. Basically, the location that the Szekelys and Transylvanian Saxons (Germans) lived were close to the historical eastern borders of Hungary. Transylvania was a part of Hungary until 1918.
Here's a map:



As you can see, the Szekelys and Germans lived near Hungary's frontiers.
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
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Europix
The question is how they ended in a enclave within an ethnic Romanian territory.
Exactly as pre WWI Hungary had enclaves of Romanians, of Germans.

Practically all states in Eastern/South-Eastern Europe had enclaves: states appeared, disappeared, moved, changed, while people remained were they where.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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Exactly as pre WWI Hungary had enclaves of Romanians, of Germans.

Practically all states in Eastern/South-Eastern Europe had enclaves: states appeared, disappeared, moved, changed, while people remained were they where.
The map above doesn't show any enclaves of Romanians within Hungary. The Romanian-majority areas of Hungary had a common border with Romania.

There are some German enclaves, though.
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
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The Romanian-majority areas of Hungary had a common border with Romania.
The Hungarian majority area in Székelyföld has also a continuity to Hungary, actually. The same way the Romanian-majority areas of Hungary had.

The discussion can be misleading: an ethnic map comprising and Hungary and Romania would be better: it would show how much of "an intersection" area is Transylvania.

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The map isn't that accurate, as it doesn't represent the complexity of the linguistical puzzle in the region.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
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SoCal
The Hungarian majority area in Székelyföld has also a continuity to Hungary, actually. The same way the Romanian-majority areas of Hungary had.

The discussion can be misleading: an ethnic map comprising and Hungary and Romania would be better: it would show how much of "an intersection" area is Transylvania.

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The map isn't that accurate, as it doesn't represent the complexity of the linguistical puzzle in the region.
Yes, there is some sort of a connection between the Szekelys and the Hungarian-majority areas--but it's certainly less solid than for the Romanian areas:

 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
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but it's certainly less solid than for the Romanian areas:
"Less solid" ... You sure, my friend?

I think You've forgotten geography: Transylvania has montains at the southern and eastern border! With average heights of 1500m, going up to more than 2.000m, with not so much valeys/canions traversing them. Plus, the passing zones where populated mostly by Hungarians and Germans. On the other hand, the Hungarian continuum is on gigh plains/plains, large valleys. Difficult access vs easy access.

Geographic map:



An administrative map of Hungary from the17th C.



Wath's interesting in it is that the three most important acces points/trading routes are controled by German communities (Hermanstadt/Sibiu/Szeben), Kronstadt (Brasso/Brasov) and Bistritz (Bistrita/Beszterce). There is one in Székelyföld.

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PS: I was talking about the accuracy of the ethnic map. I found one that it's at municipality level. If You have the time to loock a bit closer, You'll see what I meant: there are more than one place where the "clusters"/"pockets" are very small. (100 years ago it was even more complex, as the German, Jewish, Slav where more present than today)



(here's the link for high-resolution img, if You wanna look closer: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dd/EthnoRom30actualise.JPG
 
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