Did Hungary's pre-WWI Magyarization policy include encouraging Hungarians to settle in the non-Hungarian parts of Hungary?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,787
SoCal
"Less solid" ... You sure, my friend?

I think You've forgotten geography: Transylvania has montains at the southern and eastern border! With average heights of 1500m, going up to more than 2.000m, with not so much valeys/canions traversing them. Plus, the passing zones where populated mostly by Hungarians and Germans. On the other hand, the Hungarian continuum is on gigh plains/plains, large valleys. Difficult access vs easy access.

Geographic map:



An administrative map of Hungary from the17th C.



Wath's interesting in it is that the three most important acces points/trading routes are controled by German communities (Hermanstadt/Sibiu/Szeben), Kronstadt (Brasso/Brasov) and Bistritz (Bistrita/Beszterce). There is one in Székelyföld.

_____
PS: I was talking about the accuracy of the ethnic map. I found one that it's at municipality level. If You have the time to loock a bit closer, You'll see what I meant: there are more than one place where the "clusters"/"pockets" are very small. (100 years ago it was even more complex, as the German, Jewish, Slav where more present than today)



(here's the link for high-resolution img, if You wanna look closer: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dd/EthnoRom30actualise.JPG
Are there any passes in the northern and western parts of Transylvania?
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
Are there any passes in the northern and western parts of Transylvania?
Today there are more.

Historically, in west I think it was in Csikszereda/Miercurea Ciuc region and Bistritz/Bistrita/Beszterce region (that one I think it was the link to North (-> Poland) also, after passing the Carpathians.

In North, the links were less important, as I think is moredificult to pass, plus there is the large valey of Tisza, that opens a longer but much easier road to Northern Hungary, Slovakia and south of Poland (I'm using today's countries for the sake of simplicity).

maybe this is a better map:
 
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Oct 2019
41
Budapest
So, it was simply limited to encouraging non-Magyars to begin speaking Hungarian and identifying as Magyars, correct?

If so, then I'm presuming that the massive increase in the Hungarian language in cities such as Bratislava in the pre-WWI years and decades was almost exclusively the result of Slovaks and/or Germans beginning to use the Hungarian language and identify as Magyars as opposed to being the result of large-scale Hungarian settlement in these cities, correct?
Slovaks were villagers, their ratio in the bigger cities were small. The number of Romanian Slovak and Serbian speaking villages did not decreased between 1867-1920 period.
 
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Oct 2019
41
Budapest
The goal of magyarization was to "transform" all non-magyar nationalities into magyar and create homogenous magyar nation (in sense of language and ethnicity). They never succeded in that.
Slovaks did not succesful to spread a common mutually intelligible language for Slovaks until the Czechoslovak era. Central Slovak language was not well-spread before CZ times among Slovaks..
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,787
SoCal
Slovaks were villagers, their ratio in the bigger cities were small. The number of Romanian Slovak and Serbian speaking villages did not decreased between 1867-1920 period.
Yeah, AFAIK, Hungarian minorities often became Magyarized once they moved to the cities but much more rarely if they remained in rural areas.
 
Oct 2019
41
Budapest
So, what did Slovaks speak beforehand?
Slovak is one of the youngest ethnonym in Europe, the "Slovak" term was born only in the 15th century, in the early modern period. Without own ethnonym, we can't even speak about identity or ethnicity. Slovaks were early modern period mixture of immigrants: Czech Hussites from the N-west, Polish immigrants from the north, Local Hungarians, nomadic Vlach settlers in Eastern Slovakia, Rusyn people in the east, and some German settlers. This modern mixture had a clear impact on various Slovak "dialects". In the reality this were not dialects but rather different languages. This mixature is mirrored in their many old languages Until the birth of the unified "Central Slovak" language in the 19th century, some of the Slovak dialects were closer to Czech language, others were closer to Polish language another dialects were closer to the Rusyn language. So Slovaks did not have even a common mutually intelligible language (which is a corner point of a real nation or an ethnic group) until the Slovak linguistic reforms of the 19th century. You can read about it here: Learn Slovak - Dialects The common unified mutually intelligible Slovak language was spread by the Czechoslovak school system during the interwar period and the communist era, which remained the central policy and goal of the Czechoslovak governments.
 
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