Did Minoan tried to invade Egypt

Apr 2019
109
Ireland
#11
Egyptians developed a good naval force only to face the Sea Peoples [think to Ramses III], not the Minoans. This would suggest that the Minoans have never been a threat for the civilization of the River Nile.

To attack Egypt from the Mediterranean Sea has never been difficult in ancient times. The point is that Egypt has got only one "highway" to reach the centers of power ... River Nile. And along that "highway" Egyptians had organized a hell of strongholds and fortresses.

In other words, to land along the coasts of the delta with a giant fleet was simply a slow suicide. Historically, Egypt had to be invaded and conquered by land, coming from Asia, like everyone who has conquered Egypt has done. Obviously before of modern times.
I thought the Egyptians lagged behind the Minoans and Phoenicians in the technology of sea-going vessels. Was this Egyptian fleet a river fleet for use exclusively inside the delta? That is where the engagement happened was it?
 
Likes: Crowley
Mar 2015
858
Europe
#12
Was Egypt ever all that vulnerable to pirates?
The coastal area of Egypt was sand dunes and salt and papyrus swamps for several tens of km from coast. With only small villages of little value - Rhacotis was a small village before Alexander. The real arable land and towns where wealth was started several tens of km away, like Buto.

Any pirates would face tens of kilometres up a river with locals awaiting them - whether the pirates were Minoan or Phoenician.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,586
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#13
I thought the Egyptians lagged behind the Minoans and Phoenicians in the technology of sea-going vessels. Was this Egyptian fleet a river fleet for use exclusively inside the delta? That is where the engagement happened was it?
Actually Ramses III used a sea fleet to surprise the enemies [and this was surprising, just because the lack of experience of the Egyptians about sea warfare]. The main naval battle happened anyway near the coast, in front of Pelusium. The surprising decision was to make a secondary fleet coming from the open sea. The Sea Peoples probable didn't expect this from the Egyptians. Overall they didn't expect heavy warships ...

Anyway the battle was already almost over, the main tactic was to push the Sea Peoples to fight near the coasts where Egyptian bowmen were ready to hit the hostile vessels.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,586
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#14
Was Egypt ever all that vulnerable to pirates?
The coastal area of Egypt was sand dunes and salt and papyrus swamps for several tens of km from coast. With only small villages of little value - Rhacotis was a small village before Alexander. The real arable land and towns where wealth was started several tens of km away, like Buto.

Any pirates would face tens of kilometres up a river with locals awaiting them - whether the pirates were Minoan or Phoenician.
The delta was a kind of navigable labyrinth, the point was to know where to pass [a bit like to enter the Venetian lagoon]. Anyway it's true that if Egyptians defended the delta from the coasts [like the army of Ramses III did] it was extremely difficult to reach the inland. But normally Egyptians defended more South [just because in the delta there was a very little to defend].
 
Mar 2019
52
Belgium
#15
Perhaps it's slipped my mind but I don't recall Minoan murals from Amarna. However, their work was found in an 18th Dynasty palace built at Tell el-Dab'a, the site of the former Hyksos capital, Avaris. IIRC, the palace was from the era of Thutmosis III. The existence of such works outside Crete were not unique to Egypt, though. Minoan murals have been found in the northern Levant as well. These must have been the product of immigrants or traveling artisans, though...because there's no indication of an associated hostile invasion. Egypt was a very dominant power at that time.
Indeed but Egypt was more a "cultural" great power than a military power. We can see the same thing with China which was invaded many times by foreigners who adopted the culture of their han subjects (Tibetans, Turcik people, mongols, Manchu)
 
Mar 2015
858
Europe
#20
I would say both the ability to:
1) Use the sea for trading/fishing/raiding without interference from other states
2) Prevent other states from using the sea for trading/fishing/raiding
When do you think did 2) become technologically practical?
Two navies might very well raid each other´s homelands and be unable to prevent the other from doing so because they simply cannot find each other at sea.
 

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