Did Minoan tried to invade Egypt

Feb 2011
797
Kitchener. Ont.
#21
To attack Egypt from the Mediterranean Sea has never been difficult in ancient times. The point is that Egypt has got only one "highway" to reach the centers of power ... River Nile. And along that "highway" Egyptians had organized a hell of strongholds and fortresses.
Some of the ancient sources do warn that to attack Egypt from the sea was a very dangerous undertaking. Foreigners sailing against Egypt would run aground on the ever shifting sandbanks, and if they managed to survive these, they could fall victim to piracy from the inhabitants of the many islands on the periphery of the Delta.
Egyptian defenses were deep inside the Delta, the outer regions were unstable. The most likely defendable positions would be at harbors.

One of the other considerations is, that sea-going vessels require a deep draft to remain stable in open sea, but vessels with a deep draft cannot penetrate the inner waterways of the Delta. Flat bottomed, or shallow draft vessels are required to manouver into the Delta.
Enemy forces have no ability to change their vessels to attack Egypt, which is probably why none of them did.
 
Mar 2018
727
UK
#22
One of the other considerations is, that sea-going vessels require a deep draft to remain stable in open sea, but vessels with a deep draft cannot penetrate the inner waterways of the Delta. Flat bottomed, or shallow draft vessels are required to manouver into the Delta.
Enemy forces have no ability to change their vessels to attack Egypt, which is probably why none of them did.
The Vikings seemed fine using the same ships to cross the north sea and go deep inside rivers.
 
Mar 2018
727
UK
#25
These are not Viking ships.

Of course the minoan ships are not viking ones. I was just pointing out that it *is* possible to have ships that can cross moderately rough seas AND sail up shallow rivers. The vikings prove that there is at least one design possible that allows it. Anything with a movable keel would also do a decent job I guess (no idea how realistic that is for wooden ships though, I'm not really a sailor).
 
Likes: Crowley
Jun 2018
471
New Hampshire
#27
According to some less than reputable historians, the Minoan empire included the Great Lakes region of North America. Apparently, the missing copper is best explained by the presence of Minoan mining expeditions from circa 2000 BC.
 
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Aug 2018
229
Italy
#29
They had ships but what evidence do we have that the Minoans were a great sea power? Which colonies did they found outside of their local Aegean islands?
Miletus and some other sites in the Aegean such as Akrotiri seem to have been Minoan colonies. They had some cultural influence over the Eastern Mediterranean: Cypro Minoan, the script used in Cyprus in the Late Bronze Age originated from Linear A, the Minoan script, and Minoan frescoes were appreciated by the kings of Egypt and the Levant.
That said I don't think they had power over the Eastern Mediterranean, because at the time there weren't real war ships, so they hardly could rule the whole Eastern Mediterranean sea, they likely controlled most of the Aegean however.
 
Feb 2011
797
Kitchener. Ont.
#30
Of course the minoan ships are not viking ones. I was just pointing out that it *is* possible to have ships that can cross moderately rough seas AND sail up shallow rivers. The vikings prove that there is at least one design possible that allows it. Anything with a movable keel would also do a decent job I guess (no idea how realistic that is for wooden ships though, I'm not really a sailor).
I knew what you meant, my point was the vessels we assign to Minoans (via their artwork) look nothing like Viking ships. Which makes your argument redundant.
Centuries later shipbuilding technology advanced sufficiently to allow the Vikings to do what nations 2000 years +/- before them could not.
 
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