Did One-Eyed Warriors Fight Effectively in Melee Combat?

Feb 2019
872
Pennsylvania, US
If he had just lost his eye, I'm sure the pain alone would cripple him pretty well, though maybe the adrenaline would be enough in that continuous melee to keep him fighting.

Soon as he got pulled away though I bet he'd be through fighting for awhile.
"It's *just* an eye..."

itsjustaneye.jpg

:lol:
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
Having one eye will limit not only your general field of vision (straight ahead), but, perhaps more importantly, your peripheral vision. So one side of your body cannot see. That mean somebody approaching with a fist or weapon will not be seen until it's too late. One has to wonder how things like cataracts also affected one's ability to fight or defend oneself.
 
Feb 2019
345
California
Having one eye will limit not only your general field of vision (straight ahead), but, perhaps more importantly, your peripheral vision. So one side of your body cannot see. That mean somebody approaching with a fist or weapon will not be seen until it's too late. One has to wonder how things like cataracts also affected one's ability to fight or defend oneself.
Quite true what you say and I wonder if that doesn't play in to why Oliever was so successful notwithstanding his lost eye. I think the fact that he always (before and after he lost his eye) fought with no shield but only a two-handed battle-ax might explain in part why losing an eye wasn't such a bit deal for him. Fighting with such an ax requires a VERY aggressive style and lack of a left eye might not make THAT much difference if you were tall and good.....
 
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Dec 2010
272
Southwest U.S.
Hannibal supposedly was blinded in his right eye while crossing the Alps because of an infection. He managed to survive the war with Rome. I've read that he led from the front and took part in close combat, but that could be overstated.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
Hannibal supposedly was blinded in his right eye while crossing the Alps because of an infection. He managed to survive the war with Rome. I've read that he led from the front and took part in close combat, but that could be overstated.
Maybe he had somebody protecting his blindside, just like a left tackle does for a right handed throwing quarterback in American football?
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
5,234
Sydney
certainly the decrerase in the field of vision in a problem , it make the fighter virtually blind on one lateral side
one of the handicap of one eyed fighter is a greater difficulty in judging distance and movement
it doesn't affect archery or gun lying , but could be a bit of a problem in a melee
 
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Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
certainly the decrerase in the field of vision in a problem , it make the fighter virtually blind on one lateral side
one of the handicap of one eyed fighter is a greater difficulty in judging distance and movement
it doesn't affect archery or gun lying , but could be a bit of a problem in a melee
Yes. Depth perception is another serious issue in a person with one eye. Could be fatal, especially in a battle.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
My relative once got in a fight with a neighbor. He kept punching the guy in the left side of his face. Neither guy was hurt, as the fight was just a few jabs from both sides before I intervened. I asked him why he kept hitting him on that side. He told me that the guy had only one eye and that was his blindside. So it will affect somebody in a fight. Just common sense says so.