Did Spain's experience being ruled by Swedish Arians effect its strong opposition to protestantism?

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,341
The Iberian peninsula was mostly Christian by the fall of the Roman Empire, but its new Gothic rulers were Arians. Did this effect its strong Catholicism and opposition to protestantism? Obviously, it was under Muslim rule more recently. Then all Muslims and Jews were forced to leave or convert. The Inquisition persecuted lapsed "new Christians" and "heretics". I wonder if both experiences of pressure to join other religions effected Spain's strong Catholicism, holy wars, and intolerance.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,902
Portugal
The Iberian peninsula was mostly Christian by the fall of the Roman Empire, but its new Gothic rulers were Arians. Did this effect its strong Catholicism and opposition to protestantism? Obviously, it was under Muslim rule more recently. Then all Muslims and Jews were forced to leave or convert. The Inquisition persecuted lapsed "new Christians" and "heretics". I wonder if both experiences of pressure to join other religions effected Spain's strong Catholicism, holy wars, and intolerance.
In my opinion, no. And I don’t think that there are bases to say such a thing. Much less to talk about “Swedish Arians”.

You are talking here about events separated by centuries and forgetting some in the middle.

The Visigoths controlled all the Iberian peninsula but they lost that control to the Muslim invaders.

The process that we know as “Reconquista”, wasn’t a Visigoth re-conquer. The term “Reconquista” is probably not medieval. Martin, said to me here that is a 19th century term. I can’t confirm it, but he most probably is right.

With the Reconquista, in the 11th and 12th centuries the old catholic religion, of the Visigothic rite, was completely replaced by the Cluny rite, originating some tension in the clerics. The ideas that prevailed were the ones of Cluny, not the Visigothic ones (even so, not Swedish, and not Arian for centuries)

Furthermore there were no Inquisitions in Castile in the Middle Ages, while there were in many other European kingdoms. The Early Medieval Spanish inquisition was mostly and initially a political move.

The intolerance may have its roots in the Reconquista, especially in the High Middle Ages, as a response to the intolerance of the Almoravids and Almohads. But there is a huge gap between that intolerance and the Visigothic intolerance to the Jews. As for the intolerance to the Protestantism, and of the Protestantism to the Catholicism, you saw that kind of intolerance all over Europe, it wasn’t a Iberian phenomenon.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,095
The Iberian peninsula was mostly Christian by the fall of the Roman Empire, but its new Gothic rulers were Arians. Did this effect its strong Catholicism and opposition to protestantism? Obviously, it was under Muslim rule more recently. Then all Muslims and Jews were forced to leave or convert. The Inquisition persecuted lapsed "new Christians" and "heretics". I wonder if both experiences of pressure to join other religions effected Spain's strong Catholicism, holy wars, and intolerance.
If you look at the Protestant-Catholic split in Western Europe, many of the Catholic countries were those areas that were part of the Roman Empire, and the Protestant countries were those countries that had never been part of the Roman Empire. Spain, Italy, France, southern Germany, Austria, were all part of the Roman Empire. Northern Germany, Scandinavian countries, Scotland had never been part of the Roman empire.

England and Ireland are kind of an exception, but England was settled by people who had never been part of the Roman Empire (Angle, Saxons, Jutes), and Ireland probably remained Catholic because the English were Protestants. France remained Catholic too, although it did have a strong Protestant minority at one time, but the French Protestants were eventually driven out.

The Spanish crown desire for a strong central government might have caused it to discourage Protestants, just as it did Jews and Muslims. Religion, the Catholic religion, was seen as a unifying national force which other religions would weaken.