Did Spartan women kill gay men?

Mar 2012
2,345
#21
I really agree with aggienation idea here. I read some of Plutarch works, some totally, others partially, but I don’t recall to read this, so it would be interesting to read those specific paragraphs/sentences, so we can know in detail about what we are talking. Besides reading his words can give us a better idea to formulate some questions, specifically: What was the time period? Was about the beginning of the Roman Empire or the Greek Classical Age? Don’t know much about Sparta, but I have the idea that there were huge changes.

I have read all of the parallel lives, and I do not recall this at all. All I remember is that Plutarch said that Lycurgus forbid homosexual pederasty. No beating to death that I remember.

But it has been awhile. I could be wrong.
 
Sep 2014
837
Texas
#22
which part? You don't think a minority of men would tolerate abuse because they feared resisting it? As for the Roman thing...horrible just horrible. Of course things are constantly in flux where the ancient Greeks are concerned.
So you think the boys who were killed were just randomly selected?
pg. 62 Lycurgus - Plutarch
"I myself have seen several of the youths endure whipping to the death at the foot of the alter of Diana surnamed Orthia." Now I'm really disheartened. Not that this cruelty happened, but that apparently I am the only one in this discussion to has read Plutarch.

pg. 60
These public processions of the maidens , and their appearing naked in their dances and exercises, were enticements to marriage ...........bachelors were in a degree disenfranchised by law, for they were excluded from the sight of public processions in which the young men and maidens danced naked, and in the winter time, the officers compelled them to march naked themselves round the marketplace, singing as they went a certain song to their own disgrace, that they justly suffered this punishment for disobeying the law. Moreover, they were denied that respect and observance which younger men paid the elders; and no man found fault with what was said to Dercyllidas , though so eminant a commander, upon whose approach one day, a young man , instead of rising , retained his seat , remarking, "No child of yours will make room for me."

I'll have to concede the girls going out at night, (it's there but I just can't see well enough to look for it), so to the two bozos who quoted Leonidas, a nonexistant book, grow up.

Now I am more convinced that the Spartan women did retaliate.
 
Mar 2012
2,345
#24
pg. 62 Lycurgus - Plutarch
"I myself have seen several of the youths endure whipping to the death at the foot of the alter of Diana surnamed Orthia." Now I'm really disheartened. Not that this cruelty happened, but that apparently I am the only one in this discussion to has read Plutarch.

pg. 60
These public processions of the maidens , and their appearing naked in their dances and exercises, were enticements to marriage ...........bachelors were in a degree disenfranchised by law, for they were excluded from the sight of public processions in which the young men and maidens danced naked, and in the winter time, the officers compelled them to march naked themselves round the marketplace, singing as they went a certain song to their own disgrace, that they justly suffered this punishment for disobeying the law. Moreover, they were denied that respect and observance which younger men paid the elders; and no man found fault with what was said to Dercyllidas , though so eminant a commander, upon whose approach one day, a young man , instead of rising , retained his seat , remarking, "No child of yours will make room for me."

I'll have to concede the girls going out at night, (it's there but I just can't see well enough to look for it), so to the two bozos who quoted Leonidas, a nonexistant book, grow up.

Now I am more convinced that the Spartan women did retaliate.
It has been a good decade or so since I read the life of Lycurgus, but I seem to remember that the whipping had to do with training. I could be confusing this with another source, but I think it might have been talking about the time when the agoge was in decline and all that was left of Spartan training was a sort of senseless torture to prove pain tolerance.

I don't think it has anything to do with gay men.
 
Nov 2011
977
The Bluff
#26
Someone needs to learn the difference between novels and history as well as how to quote a source (book, chapter, passage or line). As well, the "life" of Lykurgos is more myth than reality and much of the "laws" it contains relate to times later than the mythical lawgiver.

The passage quoted has absutely nothing to do with supposed homosexual men and I struggle to see how a comprehending mind might construe such.
 
Aug 2010
15,666
Welsh Marches
#27
The answer is no. I wonder if the OP is any better able to retain an accurate memory of what he has read that of what he has seen ("I saw a program narrated by a British woman who said that all Spartans were gay (men and women) and the men had to be tricked into having sex with the women"!!) We really ought to have a competion for who can ask the silliest question about homosexuality in ancient Greece.
 
Sep 2014
837
Texas
#28
The answer is no. I wonder if the OP is any better able to retain an accurate memory of what he has read that of what he has seen ("I saw a program narrated by a British woman who said that all Spartans were gay (men and women) and the men had to be tricked into having sex with the women"!!) We really ought to have a competion for who can ask the silliest question about homosexuality in ancient Greece.
Well the men on this group need to actually read the books. And I am an ancient broad and veteran. Damn you boys are slow and mean tempered.
 
#29
It has been a good decade or so since I read the life of Lycurgus, but I seem to remember that the whipping had to do with training. I could be confusing this with another source, but I think it might have been talking about the time when the agoge was in decline and all that was left of Spartan training was a sort of senseless torture to prove pain tolerance.

I don't think it has anything to do with gay men.
Yeap, it refers to the agoge.
 

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