Did the Anglo-Americans ever consider sending a lot of their own troops to the USSR to help the Soviets fight the Nazis in WWII?

Futurist

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May 2014
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Did the Anglo-Americans ever consider sending a lot of their own troops to the USSR to help the Soviets fight the Nazis in WWII? In both World Wars, the Anglo-Americans sent a lot of their own troops to France to help fight the Germans, but I was wondering if the idea of the Anglo-Americans sending a lot of their own troops to the USSR was ever considered during WWII--for instance, to discourage the USSR from making a separate peace by giving the USSR some military assistance in its fight against the Nazis? I mean, Yes, the Eastern Front was certainly a meat-grinder, but if the choice was between the USSR making a separate peace with Nazi Germany and the Anglo-Americans sending a lot of their own troops to the USSR, what would the Anglo-Americans have chosen?

Any thoughts on this?
 

Futurist

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May 2014
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I believe Stalin said outright that he wouldn't allow foreign troops inside the Soviet Union (aside from invaders obviously). Aside from that I believe the west did suggest it.
Do you know when the West suggested it?

Also, I could understand why Stalin wouldn't have wanted this. I mean, US and British troops interacting with the Soviet population might have given the Soviet people ideas about Western concepts such as freedom, human rights, and democracy. That said, though, I wonder if Stalin would have changed his tune in regards to this if the USSR would have been really desperate.
 
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Do you know when the West suggested it?

Also, I could understand why Stalin wouldn't have wanted this. I mean, US and British troops interacting with the Soviet population might have given the Soviet people ideas about Western concepts such as freedom, human rights, and democracy. That said, though, I wonder if Stalin would have changed his tune in regards to this if the USSR would have been really desperate.
I can't find specific dates for when, I'd imagine in 41 for Britain and again in 42 for America.
I read an article somewhere years ago that said if the Germans had succeeded at Stalingrad and conquered the Caucasus, the Soviets would have been obliged to allow allied forces in Iran to cross the border.
 
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Kotromanic

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Dec 2011
5,037
Iowa USA
There's a practical issue here: English speakers can learn French phrases and be able to pronounce those phrases in broken French much more simply than they can comprehend phrases in Russian. Russian is more of a cousin to Farsi, a relatively exotic language to the English speaker's ear, while medieval French was necessary to the development of modern English.

It would not be a trivial thing to train the translators, it is another part of the considerable logistical "tail" to attempt the loan of 10 or more divisions. The thing is: the front is so broad compared to the West, would 10 divisions make a difference?
 

Futurist

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May 2014
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I can't find specific dates for when, I'd imagine in 41 for Britain and again in 42 for America.
I read an article somewhere years ago that said if the Germans had succeeded at Stalingrad and conquered the Caucasus, the Soviets would have been obliged to allow allied forces in Iran to cross the border.
Do you remember the name of the magazine that this article was located in?

There's a practical issue here: English speakers can learn French phrases and be able to pronounce those phrases in broken French much more simply than they can comprehend phrases in Russian. Russian is more of a cousin to Farsi, a relatively exotic language to the English speaker's ear, while medieval French was necessary to the development of modern English.

It would not be a trivial thing to train the translators, it is another part of the considerable logistical "tail" to attempt the loan of 10 or more divisions. The thing is: the front is so broad compared to the West, would 10 divisions make a difference?
The US could find Russian-speaking Jews, Poles, Ukrainians, and Balts to be translators for this, no? After all, those groups all came to the US in decent numbers before the 1920s--especially the Jews. Also, the US doesn't appear to have had much of a problem finding translators for Korean or Vietnamese or Pashto or Dari or Arabic in real life.
 

Kotromanic

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Dec 2011
5,037
Iowa USA
To that comment about translators for Viet or Korean?

I actually think that US Forces were handicapped by the lack of translators, especially with Viet Nam, where the rural population was mistrustful of the ARVN soldiers assigned to the Americans.

Pashto speaker translators wasn't an issue? I think that is also a dubious statement. Regarding Arabic, I'm not sure. However, I'm really not sure what you are basing that opinion on? Not to be too direct with you, but I've never imagined you having much first-person contact with veterans of the post 2001 American campaigns.
 
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Futurist

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May 2014
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SoCal
To that comment about translators for Viet or Korean?

I actually think that US Forces were handicapped by the lack of translators, especially with Viet Nam, where the rural population was mistrustful of the ARVN soldiers assigned to the Americans.
Was the same also true for Korea?

Pashto speaker translators wasn't an issue? I think that is also a dubious statement.
Well, couldn't the US find some educated Pashtuns who speak both Pashto and English to help them translate?

Regarding Arabic, I'm not sure. However, I'm really not sure what you are basing that opinion on? Not to be too direct with you, but I've never imagined you having much first-person contact with veterans of the post 2001 American campaigns.
You're right; I didn't have much contact with post-9/11 US military vets. The impression that I get about these things I generally tend to get from the news and from the stuff that I read online (which also includes news).
 

Futurist

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May 2014
22,750
SoCal
In 1940, almost 357,000 Americans spoke Russian as a mother tongue--though it's possible that much more of them spoke Russian as a second language while having some other language--such as English, Yiddish, Polish, Ukrainian, German, or some kind of Baltic language as their mother tongue:

 
Apr 2014
200
New York, U.S.
Did the Anglo-Americans ever consider sending a lot of their own troops to the USSR to help the Soviets fight the Nazis in WWII? In both World Wars, the Anglo-Americans sent a lot of their own troops to France to help fight the Germans, but I was wondering if the idea of the Anglo-Americans sending a lot of their own troops to the USSR was ever considered during WWII--for instance, to discourage the USSR from making a separate peace by giving the USSR some military assistance in its fight against the Nazis? I mean, Yes, the Eastern Front was certainly a meat-grinder, but if the choice was between the USSR making a separate peace with Nazi Germany and the Anglo-Americans sending a lot of their own troops to the USSR, what would the Anglo-Americans have chosen?

Any thoughts on this?
I don’t think that the Allies could spare a large enough force to send to the Soviet Union to have any meaningful influence on the outcome.
Please remember that by the beginning of 1942 the British and Americans were already fighting the war on multiple fronts against the Germans, Italians and the Japanese . This was stretching their available manpower resources to the limit.
A second factor was a practical one, that is, how would you transport such a large force to the SU? The Murmansk route was dangerous because of the weather and German submarine activity.
The best way to help the SU was to open a second front that would draw German forces away from the fighting on the Eastern front. **
Also, provide Lend Lease aid that would aid the Soviets in their fight against the Germans.
** One example of this was the Allied invasion of Sicily which forced Hitler to end Operation Citadel (Kursk) in order to send forces to the Italian front.