Did the California Republic have any support among California's non-American population?

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,286
Spain
#11
I wonder if anyone else here knows this. I was under the impression that Americans made up the majority of Texas's population back when it was an independent state.
Exactly if you understand americans as people from US. Before 1821 almost not "americans" in Texas. They arrived when Texas went from Spain to Mexico.
 
Likes: Futurist
Apr 2019
64
U.S.A.
#12
I wonder if anyone else here knows this. I was under the impression that Americans made up the majority of Texas's population back when it was an independent state.
Tejanos, both anglo-texan and Mexican-texan fought side by side at the Alamo. Until recently, this was not mentioned in US studies. The fact is that the latino texans were defending and fighting for independance from Mexico. The battles that insued after the Alamo gave Texas its independance in 1836
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,039
SoCal
#13
Exactly if you understand americans as people from US. Before 1821 almost not "americans" in Texas. They arrived when Texas went from Spain to Mexico.
Yeah, using this definition, there were almost no Americans in Texas in 1821, but since Texas was so sparsely populated, it is very plausible that, by 1836, a majority of Texas's population were Americans.
 
Likes: martin76

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,286
Spain
#14
Yeah, using this definition, there were almost no Americans in Texas in 1821, but since Texas was so sparsely populated, it is very plausible that, by 1836, a majority of Texas's population were Americans.
Yes Futurist... "American" population arrived to Texas after 1821 (most ot them). Moises Austin arrived to San Antonio de Bexar in Texas (from Little Rock in Arkansas) December 23rd, 1820. Spanish authorities ordered his expulsion. However Austin defended in Court, alleging that he was a Spanish subject, who acquired Spanish nationality in Missouri in 1797 (Missouri was a Spanish Dominion in those days).
The courts found that their title of citizenship was legal (January 17th, 1821). After this legal victory, Austin requested permission from Madrid for 300 "American" (from USA) families (Catholic and loyal subjects of the King) to settle between Brazos and Colorado rivers. Madrid authorized that settlement on May 22nd, 1821 .... but by then Austin had already died.

Spain (Viceroy Don Juan O`Donoju y O´Ryan) yielded the sovereignty of Texas to Mexico on August 24th, 1821 (Treaty of Cordoba)... And then... people from USA begun to go to Texas without any control .

When Spain yielded the Territory ... not more than 7.000 Spaniards (Peninsulares, Criollos, Mestizos, Mulattoes etc etc) inhabited Texas... from them, 2.516 in San Antonio de Béxar.

Regards.
 
May 2019
65
Earth
#15
What do you classify as "American"? Are you limiting it to nationals of the USA at the time?

If not, then I can tell you there were some indigenous Americans who fought for the US side against the Mexicans in California during that period. For example, some Walla Walla warriors took part in the battle of Natividad: Battle of Natividad - Wikipedia

I don't know though whether there were any indigenous Californians who supported the US side during that conflict.
 
Last edited:
Feb 2019
345
California
#16
I know that some American settlers in California briefly established a California Republic in 1846:

California Republic - Wikipedia

However, what I'm wondering about is whether this republic also had any support among California's non-American population or whether its support was limited to Americans who were living in California.
What do you mean by "non-American"?

Non citizen?
 
Likes: Futurist
Apr 2019
64
U.S.A.
#18
Some of the Californios were disgruntled with the Mexican government who simply did not have the resources after their independance from Spain. They felt excluded and forgotten. Many thought that they would be better off in the USA
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,039
SoCal
#19
Some of the Californios were disgruntled with the Mexican government who simply did not have the resources after their independance from Spain. They felt excluded and forgotten. Many thought that they would be better off in the USA
Do you think that they made up a majority of the Californio population?

Also, did residents in Mexican states further south (such as Baja California and Sonora) also express anger towards the Mexican government?
 
Apr 2019
64
U.S.A.
#20
Do you think that they made up a majority of the Californio population?

Also, did residents in Mexican states further south (such as Baja California and Sonora) also express anger towards the Mexican government?
I am not sure about baja california or the other norteños, but the californios from alta california who were not in favor of the US annex were not in the majority at first. Most I think were indifferent. Once the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed and things settled down, they began to regret their annex. After the annex the californios rancheros found their ranchos the target of squatters. This would result in many long and lengthy court battles that would dwindle their ranches because they would need to sell portions to pay for lawers and translators, (many still did not speak english). One in particular was a deal that a rancho in the middle coast area of 4437 acres was given to an american in leau of a 600 dollar debt. Another was rancho santa margarita y las flores was obtained by an anglo by what one said was a swindle. Pico, who could not read or write in english, claims to have been taken advantage of by the anglo son-in-law forster. The pico/forster feud went on clear into the 1990’s when their descendants finnally shook hands at mission san juan capistrano.
The 1849 gold rush in CA was not good for the californios. When placer began to run out it became the mexican and chinese’s fault somehow and the angry americans would not take the time to find out if they were dealing with a mexican or a californio. I