Did the Comanche ruled over an Empire?

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,831
Dispargum
#11
My knowledge on the Comanche is limited. But most importantly, I'm still unsure what the exact requirements for an empire are.
Doesn't an "empire" require some sort of central government that receives tribute or taxes from subject peoples or cities, and an "emperor"?
Yes, a central government, domination by one group of people over subject peoples (at least initially, but look to the Roman Empire for an example of how to eventually turn subject people into Romans), and having an emperor helps.
 
Oct 2016
108
Ashland
#12
Indeed, Genghis Khan ruled over a vast empire.; the 'Mongol.' This was one of the largest ever known.One of his descendants became the Emperor of China and tried to invade Japan. Some develop Civilization; others have it forced upon them; and some appropriate that of others.
At their peak, prior to 1200 or so, the' Natchez' and 'Cahokians' (collectively and with many others better known as the 'Mississippian's' ) were at a 'Complex Tribal' state before their decline and fall; not a 'civilization.'
The Comanche were simply thugs , slavers and raiders who terrorized an extensive swath of the American Southwest after stealing and/or taming horses that had run wild after the Spanish Conquest. They indeed exacted tribute, but then, so does an armed robber.

A timely Thread as we're set to watch Comanche Moon again when the ambient temperature hits 105F (likely in about 10 days, the meteorologists say). The 'Raid to the Sea' depicted therein was very real and pretty much the last gasp of the Comanche.
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,074
Europix
#14
Question : how much similarities are between Comanche and Huns?

(one of the reasons for asking is, obviously, because the "Hun empire" locution is used)
 
Jan 2018
249
San Antonio
#15
A timely Thread as we're set to watch Comanche Moon again when the ambient temperature hits 105F (likely in about 10 days, the meteorologists say). The 'Raid to the Sea' depicted therein was very real and pretty much the last gasp of the Comanche.
Of the Penatekas perhaps. The Comanche bands to the north and west raised Hell until whipped in the Red River War, what, 1874 as I recall.
 
Jan 2018
249
San Antonio
#16
Question : how much similarities are between Comanche and Huns?

(one of the reasons for asking is, obviously, because the "Hun empire" locution is used)
Not many, I think. It seems that some of the Huns had the population and political organization to threaten the very existence of great states. That would be like the Comanche being able to threaten the very existence of the United States. I reckon herdsmen are more organized and numerous than hunters. Maybe had the Plains Indians taken up herding rather than hunting...but they had little time; the horseback Plains Indian cultures were short lived and under intense pressure from outsiders from their beginnings.

Note too that the Huns had the resources and skills to make the most up to date weapons themselves; this the American Indians lacked.
 
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deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,074
Europix
#18
Not many, I think. It seems that some of the Huns had the population and political organization to threaten the very existence of great states. That would be like the Comanche being able to threaten the very existence of the United States. I reckon herdsmen are more organized and numerous than hunters. Maybe had the Plains Indians taken up herding rather than hunting...but they had little time; the horseback Plains Indian cultures were short lived and under intense pressure from outsiders from their beginnings.

Note too that the Huns had the resources and skills to make the most up to date weapons themselves; this the American Indians lacked.
Thank You.

(the only thing I think is debatable in the comparison would be the up to date weapons= the technological gap between Huns and "the others" was much smaller than Comanche's one and technology itself wasn't that advanced to need a very complex organisation, knowledge, etc. I have the impression that 1000 years earlier, the Comanche would have been able to update their weaponry too, as Huns did)
 
Sep 2014
877
Texas
#19
The Comanche were nomadic Horse Lords whose closest relatives were the Shoshone. They stole Spanish horses and traded them north. In one historical account they were fighting the Sioux in the Dakotas. Not many tribes would ride so far to pick a fight. They are one of my favorite tribes. Their veteran's group is incredible.
 

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,521
#20
Clearly it depends on what you mean by "empire".
The Comanche were a linguistic-cultural group that had no central leadership. They had migrated south from Wyoming beginning in the 1600's; and consisted of 8-12 loose, shifting, nomadic warrior bands based on kinship or the following of some notable warrior. Several bands might join temporarily to fight a powerful enemy or conduct a raid, but they soon broke up, each band or family going its own way.
The Comanche were, however, superlative horsemen and fearsome warriors. With their allies the Kiowa, they exterminated or drove out other native american groups, including Apaches and Pueblos, and dominated the southern plains (west Texas, Oklahoma, east New Mexico, southern Kansas) from the 1720's-1870's.
To add to the above, the Comanche also defeated the Spanish and their raiding depopulated much of Northern Mexico in the Comanche-Mexico Wars.

They were probably *the* most fearsome tribe in 18th and 19th Century North America.