Did Vichy France ever consider restoring the French monarchy?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,125
SoCal
#1
I was wondering if Vichy France's leadership ever seriously considered restoring the French monarchy. After all, they rejected France's republicanism and thus one would think that this would have been an idea that they should have at least seriously considered.

Anyway, does anyone here have any information in regards to this?
 
Oct 2011
7,654
MARE PACIFICVM
#3
I doubt it was ever considered. There was too much connection between French royalty and the Divine Right. Anyone with the approval of God would have outranked Hitler. The Germans wouldn't have allowed that.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,340
Las Vegas, NV USA
#6
The Nazis did allow monarchies to remain in Romania and Bulgaria, though.
But not Yugoslavia. Peter II was forced to flee when the Nazis invaded. He was put on the throne by opponents of his father who signed a non aggression pact with Germany.

The last Bourbon was Charles X (1830). "Citizen King" Louis Philippe and "Emperor" Louis Napoleon Bonaparte were self-styled pseudo-royalty. By 1940 France was republican to the bone.
 
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pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,270
#7
No not at all. There simply was not enough support even within the restricted group of French that was Vichy. Vichy was made up on a number of fairly disparate groups, writing a Constitution would have been an pretty stressful process as they would have to work out what they were for rather than the more easy what they were against.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,125
SoCal
#8
But not Yugoslavia. Peter II was forced to flee when the Nazis invaded. He was put on the throne by opponents of his father who signed a non aggression pact with Germany.
That was only done because he repudiated this non-aggression pact, though. Nazi Germany would have had no problem with the Yugoslav monarchy had Yugoslavia been willing to continue cooperating with Nazi Germany.

The last Bourbon was Charles X (1830). "Citizen King" Louis Philippe and "Emperor" Louis Napoleon Bonaparte were self-styled pseudo-royalty. By 1940 France was republican to the bone.
Charles X's male line died out in 1883, and Louis-Philippe's male line were their successors. Louis-Philippe and his descendants certainly weren't pseudo-royalty; after all, Louis-Philippe was descended in the male-line from Louis XIV's gay younger brother Philippe.

The Bonapartes are pseudo-royalty, though. However, what's interesting is that France almost restored the monarchy in the early 1870s but the opposition of Henri, Count of Chambord to the French tricolor flag put an end to this idea.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,340
Las Vegas, NV USA
#9
Charles X's male line died out in 1883, and Louis-Philippe's male line were their successors. Louis-Philippe and his descendants certainly weren't pseudo-royalty; after all, Louis-Philippe was descended in the male-line from Louis XIV's gay younger brother Philippe.
If Charles X wasn't the last of his male line, why did Louis Philippe become "Citizen King" where "citizen" is very much a republican concept from the French Revolution.i
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,125
SoCal
#10
If Charles X wasn't the last of his male line, why did Louis Philippe become "Citizen King" where "citizen" is very much a republican concept from the French Revolution.i
In 1830, Charles X had a living son and grandson. When Charles X and his son Louis abdicated, Charles X's grandson Henri was meant to be the new French King. Thus, Louis-Philippe needed some sort of foundation for himself to become the French King--else he would be a simple usurper. He found this foundation by tying his rule to republican concepts such as citizenship.